Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Brian.Dixon

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 97
1
I plan to install load rails once I get the boat finished.

I believe in them .... when it's windy and/or a current are trying to spin your boat around, you'll really appreciate them.

2

That IS a really sweet trailer ... love those steps at the stern.  Of all the people that finished their boat after it was on a trailer, you'll have the easiest time of all.  Beautiful....

Brian


3
Nice!  And that folding tongue is a real life saver for getting it back in the shop too ... looking good!  (Even though you'll have to drive fast since you have racing wheels on that rig :D )


4
Json and others who are building the Kodiak Model.  Go to our website and download the latest Kodiak Model instruction manual (dated 1-11-2020):

UPDATE:
  • I added detailed information on how the 5" additional hull depth in the Kodiak Model impacts components that are sized based on the height of the boat's gunnels: Forward Cuddy Bulkhead, Aft Cuddy Bulkhead, Aft Pilot House Bulkhead, and Pilot House Lower Side Panels
  • NO drawings were impacted by this update
  • NOTE: The Kodiak "all files" ZIP document has been updated as well (dated 1-11-2020).

Let me know if you have any questions.

Brian

5
Announcements / UPDATE: Kodiak Model addendum 1-11-2020
« on: January 11, 2020, 10:23:29 AM »
UPDATE:
  • I added detailed information on how the 5" additional hull depth in the Kodiak Model impacts components that are sized based on the height of the boat's gunnels: Forward Cuddy Bulkhead, Aft Cuddy Bulkhead, Aft Pilot House Bulkhead, and Pilot House Lower Side Panels
  • NO drawings were impacted by this update
  • NOTE: I have also updated the Kodiak "all files" ZIP document and the product hosting company ZIP file as well - the file that is downloaded via email upon initial purchase.  At our website download page, you'll see a 1-11-2020 date on the ZIP file now.
Let me know if you have any questions.

Brian

6
Experimental Postings / Test Pick again
« on: January 10, 2020, 07:04:54 AM »
This is a test pic:


7
Ok, ya, I thought it was raised, 6" is a lot. :) I will have to keep that in mind for any measurement that needs the reference of the shelves or sheer deck (sheet 13x comes to mind, the fore cuddy bulkhead, which has a vertical measurement which should be from the sheer deck I think). Just to double check I should be removing that amount from such instances right?

jb

I just double checked... the Kodiak is 5" deeper, not 6".  Look at the Temporary Framing section of the Kodiak Addendum.

 Also, in the section called "Superstructure", the Kodiak addendum says to make the pilot house no taller than for the standard Great Alaskan ... which indirectly implies that both the lower pilot house side panels and the cuddy side panels will be shorter, vertically, by 5" on the Kodiak as compared to the standard.  That's if you want the windows of the pilot house to be just the same as the Standard (what I recommend).  You will fit the aft cuddy and aft house bulkheads to the taller hull of the Kodiak, no problem.  Adjusting the house lower and cuddy side panels shorter may prevent the strong downslope of the Newport design's cuddy ... Don't feel bad if you need to adjust, vertically, the lower pilot house and cuddy side panels to get the effect that you want.  And as you mention, these thoughts apply to the forward cuddy bulkhead, height of the aft cuddy bulkhead above the sheer etc.  I should probably flesh out some of these details and update the Kodiak Addendum a bit.  There's always something ... :) .  The goal with the Kodiak is to give it a nice proportionate hull and house height.  The house and cuddy will be more 'hidden in the hull' than with the standard Great Alaskan ... which looks better and is safer, more seaworthy, without adding unnecessary height to the house ... don't need more windage when parking in a slip!

Brian


8
Is the sheer raised in the GA Kodiak? Should I be translating this into an offset for things like how tall the cuddy roof is above the sheer decks? I am not particularly tall so I don't think I would need say an additional 4" of headroom in there or the cabin if that would be the result of using measurements as stated, although maybe it would be nice if it wasn't going to cause issues with the wind. 

The sheer on the Kodiak is about 6" higher than on the standard Great Alaskan, but the pilot house roof is at the SAME height as the standard.  There was no reason to raise the roof, so to speak, on the Kodiak!  Take a look at the Temporary Framing drawing in the Kodiak Addendum.

Brian

PS: Haven't heard of image upload issues ... a 500 error response is 'Server Error'.  Odd.  Still having the issue?  If so, email the pic to me and I'll look into it.  I'm at idaho dot dixons at gmail dot com


9
I think that's the largest tank yet ... 400-500 miles range :)


10
That's quite a tank ... size?  What's your plan for hold-downs?

11
If an area of the boat is going to be inaccessible, either 'hard to get a human in there' or 'not possible to access', then ALL components that build that area must be glassed ahead of time and you must seal all exposed end grain.  Example:  When you have the top of some chamber (a deck for example) ready to install, first make sure that everything inside the to-be-enclosed chamber is glassed, end grain filled and coated to seal, etc so that everything is waterproof.  On the 'enclosing lid piece', also seal all edge grain and make sure that the piece is completely encapsulated and water proof.  NOW you can install it, and if you can't reach in to apply fillets, then you have too put beads of thickened epoxy on nailers/supports etc (or on top edge of web stringers) and press the 'enclosing piece (deck or whatever)' into place and let it cure.  Some things are impossible to fillet after the fact.  That's OK.  Just take steps to ensure that all parts are fully waterproof and encapsulated before final assembly.

Brian



12
VERY good fairing job!

13
Nice job on all that fairing ... believe me, I know how much work that is!  The results look fantastic!  Your boat is really going to be nice ... you work will reward you every time you look at it!

Brian

PS: Yeah ... tends to get quiet around the holidays and in the 'recovery period' right after.



14
I think the plans call for 3/8.  The long eyes are really hard to find.  It looks like mine did ship after a week.   Amazon is nothing like it use to be.  I should have them middle of next week

If you can't get long enough shanks, get the longest ones you can.  Inside the bow, use a spade or Forstner bit to drill an oversize hole that's big enough for the U-bolt and washers.  Drill deep enough so that the shanks will extend into the hole enough to take a washer and nut.  Coat the bejeebies  out of everything with epoxy, then install the U-bolts from outside ... and on the inside, tighten them in with a washer and nut.  Use caulk when you install.  In other words, buy the longest shank 3/8" stainless (316 is best) U-bolts that you can find, then countersink on the inside of the stem deep enough for getting the washer and nut on. 

The stem is strong enough even if you drill a hole clear through, so don't worry about it ... do the best you can with the longest shanks you can get.

Another option is to use a barrel-nut to add all-thread extensions to the shanks.  I know of one guy that did this with great success, but the technique above is preferred.

Brian

15
General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Glassing the sheer decks
« on: January 01, 2020, 10:45:32 AM »
Thanks Brian, that clears up a lot. I was planning (and made some headway) glassing the blanks for the sheer decks with 4oz on the bottom and 10oz on top, then cutting the blanks to shape, then using 10oz 4" tape for the seams/side panel joints. Is 4oz on the bottom side of the shelves sufficient since I assume they don't need abrasion resistance?

4-oz on the bottoms is perfect!  The goal is "no exposed plywood - glass to prevent checking - complete waterproof encapsulation".  You only need 10-oz where you will have FOOT (or gear) traffic.

Brian :D


Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 97