Author Topic: Outdoor build of GA  (Read 141 times)

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json

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Outdoor build of GA
« on: November 20, 2018, 10:33:38 AM »
Hi all,

I have recently started building a GA. I live in southern California, and am lucky enough to have a pretty decent spot to build a boat. My city (Orange) is somewhat a bunch of sticklers about things though, to the point where they made me build a 6 foot fence to make a shop yard if I was going to be building anything in my driveway. I am pretty sure they won't let me build a temporary shelter for a project like this (some people might think it's an eyesore?), so that said what am I going to run into if I do a lot of this build outside? The temperature is pretty mild, there is direct sunlight though, and some things concern me like condensation on things like the jig or pieces of wood that I have yet to encapsulate. I know many people who contribute here build in enclosed shops in the pac nw (I am from a portland suburb so it's definitely a stark contrast to the weather we receive here). My weather very rarely gets below freezing and we get very little rain. It's typically sunny and 70.

I guess the long and short of it is what things should I be aware of / trying to prevent when I am building outside? Is moisture in the air going to be of concern? Can I cover my project in a tied down tarp when I am not working on it to sufficiently protect it from the elements? I can build a lot of the sub-assemblies in my shop but it's only 25x25 so I don't quite have the room in there. Any ideas/advise would be extremely welcome.

Thanks!

Jason

Brian.Dixon

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Re: Outdoor build of GA
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2018, 11:31:53 AM »
The process will be one of those one step at a time things, figuring it out as you go.  You're not the first though ... I know a guy in Alaska who built his outside.  He tried to keep the coating down to a minimum when there was direct sunlight on the project and that sort of thing, e.g. coat late afternoon or early evening (paint or epoxy) when it's cooling and dry.  He did have his project get rained on right after adding a fresh coat of epoxy to the sheer decks ... it was sort of funny though, because the rain created a natural anti-skid dimpled surface that turned out pretty cool.  The rain just bounces off the wet epoxy.  He did go ahead an add another coat later though, once it was dry.

Sometimes you can violate CC&Rs and get the HOA cops after you if you need to in order to get a stage of the process done.  I would view such things as a temporary cost to pay while you finish up the project.  Fines usually aren't too bad and you only have to pay them off before you sell the house.... for example, plan ahead on things like painting the exterior and then build a temporary shelter that you leave up for a month .... do your work and then take it down .... pay the fines if there are any and move on.  So?  :)

Some have built in the garage for 90% of the build (all but the top half of the pilot house) and have had the building jig on wheels so you could roll or rotate it out, work on it and put it back.  Others have built temporary 'extensions' out of tarp or plywood on the front of their garage to extend the boat working area out onto the driveway.  If the HOA complains, tell them you're taking it down as soon as you can... keep'm on a string :)

Brian

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json

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Re: Outdoor build of GA
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2018, 06:11:30 PM »
Thanks for weighing in Brian. You bring up good points about just ignoring or leading the city enforcers on to get the stuff done and chalking any fines up to part of the cost of acquiring a bad ass boat. It sounds like a good tactic to use honestly, I will definitely keep that in mind. Also hearing that someone built a GA outside in AK makes me feel a lot better about the prospects of building outside. If he could get it from getting inundated with water I should be able to do the same I imagine (like I said, not much rain). I saw that a gentleman built a Tolman jumbo in a boat yard in San Diego under a costco canopy, I could see that type of thing getting leveled in a bout of heavy wind but with the right seasonal planning maybe I could get it up and down before it became an issue. Anyways, thanks again for your ideas. I am sure I will have many more questions moving forward, sounds like this is the place to ask them.

Brian.Dixon

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Re: Outdoor build of GA
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2018, 06:11:36 AM »
Another viable option (check the rules) is to consider finishing up in a storage unit type shelter .... the roof-only type where boats and RVs get stored.  Might have to get a small portable generator for some work, but for outfitting, painting, and that sort of thing, this might be another option.  If it violates the rules however, then there's a lot of liability parked around you in a place like that .... but for some aspects of finishing up, it can work (once the boat's on a trailer.  You could even park it there, bring it home to work on in the driveway, then haul it back.  Sometimes you have to be creative but where there's a will, there's a way.

Brian

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davidnolan

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Re: Outdoor build of GA
« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2018, 12:07:50 PM »
that's perfect really.... once you get the hang of it its no big deal... Id say S CA is perfect.  Direct sunlight and high temps might set off glue fast... there are workarounds... its an easier problem than cold for sure.      you could get bugs in the glue... sand them off.   I built outside in temperate NJ andstarted in march... one night I had snow on my tarp.   a good compromise is one of thse 8 by 16 taprs    put two together and stretch the legs out..... its removeable....  talk to your neighbors first if you think its an issue... other wise a tarp is doable....


do it.  you wont regret it

I glassed yest in 50 degree heat and had to use a weed burner to pre heat the wood...

json

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Re: Outdoor build of GA
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2018, 05:50:16 PM »
Hey David, thanks for the info! My thoughts are inline with what you are saying here, so good to hear it confirmed. :) It's a big project to jump into but I may never have a spot that's suitable in the future so I might as well dive in and try to make it happen now. I might make some kind of a-frame over the project that I can drape tarps over when I am not working on the project (keep the tarps off of glue and the project out of the elements as best as possible and whatnot), and just remove them when I am busy doing stuff.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2018, 05:51:30 PM by json »

Cannon

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Re: Outdoor build of GA
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2018, 02:19:42 PM »
I think the primary object of this venture is to just do it! Boats have been built for centuries under all imaginable conditions. We tend to overthink everything when building a boat, but the key to it all is just to seriously apply ourselves and start. Procrastination is the biggest killer of dreams and the start of mediocrity! You can do this!
Remember, the ark was built by amateurs; the Titanic was built by professionals.
Started building Paula J the 2nd Week of June 2015, finished her the second week of July 2016.

json

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Re: Outdoor build of GA
« Reply #7 on: December 14, 2018, 02:09:51 PM »
Thanks for the wise words Cannon. I can definitely see where overthinking could be a huge time sink. I have been working on the project for a month or 2 when I can (got the stem, shelves done and working currently on the transom), but with 2 small kids and 2 jobs sucking up 60 hours a week it's hard to find time. I am hoping the 2 job thing changes in the not too distant future, in the meantime I am just plugging away where I can and trying to just keep the project moving forward.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2018, 02:31:21 PM by json »

Brian.Dixon

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Re: Outdoor build of GA
« Reply #8 on: Today at 06:16:30 AM »
Thanks for the wise words Cannon. I can definitely see where overthinking could be a huge time sink. I have been working on the project for a month or 2 when I can (got the stem, shelves done and working currently on the transom), but with 2 small kids and 2 jobs sucking up 60 hours a week it's hard to find time. I am hoping the 2 job thing changes in the not too distant future, in the meantime I am just plugging away where I can and trying to just keep the project moving forward.

That's the main thing ... keep making progress whenever you can, and it'll get done :)   Unless you're retired, most have busy schedules while building .... You'll forget all about it after the boat's done

Brian

><((((> .`.><((((> .`.><((((>  The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by anyone! -
 http://www.glacierboats.com  ><((((> .`.><((((> .`.><((((>