Author Topic: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK  (Read 8306 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Brian.Dixon

  • Administrator
  • Commodore
  • *****
  • Posts: 1376
    • View Profile
    • Glacier Boats of Alaska
Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #105 on: June 28, 2019, 07:31:17 AM »

The boat has a LOT of capacity .... Kent Cannon, when his 29-footer is loaded for bear, has 8000-8500 lbs on the water when he sets out.  That represents a payload of around 4000# ... pretty crazy.  A 30' Kodiak would carry even more.

Brian

><((((> .`.><((((> .`.><((((>  The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by anyone! -
 http://www.glacierboats.com  ><((((> .`.><((((> .`.><((((>

Dan Boccia

  • Ensign
  • **
  • Posts: 78
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #106 on: July 06, 2019, 06:44:32 PM »
Official launch date will be July 17 in Seward to coincide with my electronics supplier's visit to Seward to work on some boats there. He will assist with starting up and commissioning all the electronics and showing me the full range of capabilities, which will certainly save me months of reading manuals and trial and error.

GPS antenna and forward deck lights installed, just waiting on a roof wire seal to finish wiring the lights. Wipers done, radar and nav lights previously mounted, so all the outside electrical involving holes through the cabin (I think) is just about done.

One of the handiest items West Marine sells are the antenna clips shown below - inexpensive, very handy, and effective. A rare trilogy in marine equipment....

It's going to be a very busy couple of weeks rounding up safety gear, getting the anchor system in place, tidying up all the wire runs, and possibly getting my solar panel mounted if there's time.

Brian.Dixon

  • Administrator
  • Commodore
  • *****
  • Posts: 1376
    • View Profile
    • Glacier Boats of Alaska
Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #107 on: July 08, 2019, 08:44:18 AM »
Fantastic on the upcoming launch!  Seward's a beautiful place to christen the boat and have it's first launch! 

Brian

PS: Are you planning on arranging for some good on-the-water pix, perhaps including side views of the boat on plane and what not?  Just curious ... looking forward to seeing your beautiful boat action :)
« Last Edit: July 08, 2019, 08:50:30 AM by Brian.Dixon »
><((((> .`.><((((> .`.><((((>  The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by anyone! -
 http://www.glacierboats.com  ><((((> .`.><((((> .`.><((((>

Dan Boccia

  • Ensign
  • **
  • Posts: 78
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #108 on: July 11, 2019, 03:28:25 AM »
I will not have another boat running with me on this trip, so not likely to get any decent photos. That will happen on a future trip unless I get lucky. I'm stoked to get it wet finally!

Todd j

  • Lt. Commander
  • *****
  • Posts: 405
    • View Profile
Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #109 on: July 11, 2019, 06:38:14 AM »
Congratulations.  Im sure everything will go well!!

Brian.Dixon

  • Administrator
  • Commodore
  • *****
  • Posts: 1376
    • View Profile
    • Glacier Boats of Alaska
Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #110 on: July 11, 2019, 07:06:31 AM »
I will not have another boat running with me on this trip, so not likely to get any decent photos. That will happen on a future trip unless I get lucky. I'm stoked to get it wet finally!

I'm stoked too!  All your time and effort will be worth it when you look out through that windshield and hit that throttle.... :)

Brian

><((((> .`.><((((> .`.><((((>  The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by anyone! -
 http://www.glacierboats.com  ><((((> .`.><((((> .`.><((((>

Dan Boccia

  • Ensign
  • **
  • Posts: 78
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #111 on: July 14, 2019, 12:04:00 AM »
Last electrical item completed (other than solar system, which will be later) - wiring the forward deck lights. Marine Beam usually provides a long cable with their lights, but in this case I had to run a cable above the roof and make the splice outside, which I'm not a big fan of. In case anyone wonders how to seal wires through the roof, I have been using these wire seals from Scanstrut which I like a lot. Other brands make similar offerings. First you drill your hole for your cable, then mount the base of the cable seal, then run the wire through the hole, make the connection with heat-shrink butt connectors (in this case a step-down butt connector from my 16 gauge to 20 gauge from the light), seal the whole works with adhesive heat-shrink, so it grips the virgin cable on both ends, then place the split-rubber gasket, secure the top over the gasket and you have a leak-free assembly. Finally I used a zip-tie base and zip ties to anchor the cable. Should be a trouble-free installation.

Fired up the electronics and realized I have not connected the sonar, and further realized I don't have the sonar cable and there are none in town so that probably means no depth-sounder or fish-finder on the first outing next week, bummer! Going to have to run careful, following the charts, to stay off the bottom.

Dan Boccia

  • Ensign
  • **
  • Posts: 78
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #112 on: July 19, 2019, 02:27:02 PM »
Learned some things at yesterday's abbreviated launch. Was so busy troubleshooting and trying to keep up with my electronics technician I didn't take any decent photos of it in the water at all. Next time!:

1. With the top of the back deck 3" above the stringers, the deck stayed dry despite running in a 3 ft sloppy chop. The only time I noticed a little water on the deck near the scuppers was at launch, which is understandable.

2. The electric push-button steering for the kicker works as designed, but is clunky in a busy harbor. It will take a long time to get proficient with it. Jury is still out on this, I'm not sold on it.

3. I was shocked at how vibration-free and quiet the 250 Suzuki was at idle. There was zero vibration, and it was hard to hear if it was actually running or not. I've heard people say this, but experiencing it was surprising. What a beautiful engine! And I absolutely love the electronic shift/throttle - no more cable creep!

4. I need to lower my sonar transducer so that its longitudinal mid-line is on plane with the boat bottom. Was not explained in the installation instructions, but my electronics tech says this is how it needs to be mounted to utilize its full potential. His deep understanding of the electronics package saved me months of research, and I'm sure I would have never even figured out some of the capabilities without him.

Lot more work to do to get it fully outfitted for fishing/shrimping/camping, but it's functional and it's on!
« Last Edit: July 19, 2019, 02:28:22 PM by Dan Boccia »

Brian.Dixon

  • Administrator
  • Commodore
  • *****
  • Posts: 1376
    • View Profile
    • Glacier Boats of Alaska
Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #113 on: July 19, 2019, 04:59:20 PM »
Congratulations!!!  ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

Can't wait to see the on-the-water pictures!  (Hopefully with fish blood all over that brand new paint!)

Brian

><((((> .`.><((((> .`.><((((>  The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by anyone! -
 http://www.glacierboats.com  ><((((> .`.><((((> .`.><((((>

Dan Boccia

  • Ensign
  • **
  • Posts: 78
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #114 on: July 27, 2019, 07:03:26 PM »
Got out on a 3-day shakedown very bare-bones cruise. Boat is basically just a functional shell, still not outfitted to shrimp or fish and nowhere to even hang a towel or a sock on the boat yet, so it's spartan to say the least. I consider the build still underway, thus I'm still posting in the build thread, as I learned a lot that will probably be useful to other builders

1. I raised the deck 3" above the stringers, and with no load on the back deck, the scuppers are right at 5" above the waterline, maybe 5 1/4" at best. The deck remains reliably dry. Will post an update when loaded for shrimp/skiing, etc.

2. Boat's best planing speed seems to be right at 22 knots as Brian designed, 3500 rpm, 3.25 nmpg, 6.8 gal/hr with the Suzi 250 with a Solas Lexor Plus 16 x 19 stainless prop. I was hoping to burn 6 gal/hr or a bit less at cruise, so I suspect trying a few different props would be worthwhile. My goal is to get maximum fuel economy in the 20-25 knot range and still be able to reliably go 35 knots even loaded. Could care less about acceleration or hole shot, and anything over 35 knots is unrealistic  for a variety of reasons. My 3 mpg point was reached at 28 knots around 4000-4100 rpm. I figure the boat weight on the water on this trip was 5200 lb, and that will go up to 6500 lb fully loaded for a long trip. Any prop suggestions from other users?

3. As expected, with all the wiring, house battery, kicker, helm, etc. she lists to SB a few degrees, so the trim tabs were useful right away. I think they should be standard issue on such a light boat - the boat handles noticeably better when running dead on vs that few degrees of list.

4. I need another access hatch in the aft end of the keel compartment just forward of the fuel tank beneath the cabin. All these compartments down the centerline of the boat have limber holes in each bulkhead, so a bit of fuel smell was detectable in the cabin. It wasn't much, but since I plan to camp a lot in the boat, I plan to put a plug in the aft end of this storage locker, and just remember to check the locker for moisture occasionally, and probably just towel it out. That will eliminate fuel vapors from migrating from the fuel tanks into the cabin.

5. The autopilot is excessively useful and convenient and remarkably accurate - much better than any other autopilot I've used. It's native to the Simrad main display and it just works. Unless you've run these and really like to try to keep the boat tracking straight through the slop, I'd recommend giving them strong consideration. It frees me up to monitor other things, and allows me to stretch and relax. I love it.

6. Given that I achieved the boat's design planing speed at around 3500 rpm, I cannot imagine this boat with a 200 hp engine - it would be revved up awfully high just to get to cruise, and have little left for heavy loads or a bit of additional speed, and I would think fuel economy would suffer. Seems like 250 is perfect for the 28.

7. I ran the boat straight through Port Wells at 22 knot cruise on autopilot in the typical 3+ ft slop with frequent whitecaps, wave direction be damned. This is a notorious stretch of cross-seas, with katabatic winds from the north off the glaciers of College Fjord and easterly or westerly winds down Passage Canal mixing. The boat rolled smoothly and predictably with the northerly swells, and pounded softly on the backs of the easterlies occasionally. I was pleasantly impressed, the boat handles nicely!

8. The windshield wipers were very handy on several occasions, even in the light mist. I can't imagine being without them. That said I either need to drive them all individually or get the synchronizing box, as my attempt to run the port/SB wipers off the same switch is a failure. They get out of synch after a few cycles and then never turn off......so I have to turn them off with the breaker to reset things. Back to the drawing board on this one.

9. I slept athwartships happily, and I'm 6'-2" tall.

10. Notice! Building the bunk tops parallel to the stringers predictably yields the aft end of the bunks lower than the forward end. I wanted to put the bunk in at a slant of 2" above parallel at aft end and 2" below parallel at the forward end, and dearly wish I hadn't allowed myself to be talked out of it. It's a big deal when you spend a lot of time sleeping on the boat as I intend to do. Am I really considering tearing this out and re-doing it?? Sigh.....

11. The 22 lb claw anchor and 40-ft of 5/16" chain is a pretty weighty pull, so I would not want to go with more weight than that. Maybe 30-ft of chain would have been plenty!

The pictures of the main display were taken in a foot and a half to two foot light chop.

That's about all, ask any questions if this raises any issues!
« Last Edit: July 27, 2019, 08:14:01 PM by Dan Boccia »

Todd j

  • Lt. Commander
  • *****
  • Posts: 405
    • View Profile
Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #115 on: July 27, 2019, 08:51:05 PM »
Are the bunks built to Brians spec?   Were they built differently?   Im very curious, your situation is something I surely want to avoid.  Thx
Todd

Dan Boccia

  • Ensign
  • **
  • Posts: 78
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #116 on: July 28, 2019, 12:53:00 AM »
Todd, I just reviewed Brian's construction sequence, and he has the bunk tops built parallel to the top of the stringers, essentially. Given that the boat will always sit with the stringers higher forward relative to the water surface, I think this is an oversight. Everyone I know sleeps with their head aft, and nobody likes to sleep with their head downhill, so I dearly wanted at least a 4" net elevation change from aft to forward, but someone, either Brian or Anthony, talked me out of it. I knew it then, and I proved it now, so it's mine to own and yours to contemplate! I made the final call, so if I want it changed it will be me that makes the painful change!

Djeffrey

  • Lieutenant
  • ****
  • Posts: 215
    • View Profile
Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #117 on: July 28, 2019, 09:04:42 AM »
Thanks Dan. Congrats on getting out on the water. Great suggestions for us guys just getting going.

Brian.Dixon

  • Administrator
  • Commodore
  • *****
  • Posts: 1376
    • View Profile
    • Glacier Boats of Alaska
Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #118 on: July 28, 2019, 09:16:42 AM »
Todd, I just reviewed Brian's construction sequence, and he has the bunk tops built parallel to the top of the stringers, essentially. Given that the boat will always sit with the stringers higher forward relative to the water surface, I think this is an oversight. Everyone I know sleeps with their head aft, and nobody likes to sleep with their head downhill, so I dearly wanted at least a 4" net elevation change from aft to forward, but someone, either Brian or Anthony, talked me out of it. I knew it then, and I proved it now, so it's mine to own and yours to contemplate! I made the final call, so if I want it changed it will be me that makes the painful change!

Probably Anthony talked you out of it ... or at least I remember no such conversation!  In any case, the bunk tops were make parallel to the stringers as a best compromise.  Depending on boat length v. loading, some Great Alaskans will trim a little low at the bow when people are sleeping, reversing the slope that you experience.  This is why I suggest some downward slope aft to help the cockpit remain self-bailing regardless of loading.  These are light boats for their weight (why you get double the gas mileage compared to others).  It's nearly impossible to predict night time trim with people sleeping onboard.  With your long house and healthy motor, your trim is the other way .. a tad higher at the bow, hence your downhill sleeping experience.  So ... If you're going to sleep alone most of the time, then do what ya gotta do with those bunk tops.  I'd probably just cut out the tops, add sloped spacers, and put on new tops.

Brian
><((((> .`.><((((> .`.><((((>  The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by anyone! -
 http://www.glacierboats.com  ><((((> .`.><((((> .`.><((((>

Dan Boccia

  • Ensign
  • **
  • Posts: 78
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #119 on: July 28, 2019, 12:24:05 PM »
Regarding the bunk tops, on my next trip out, I'm bringing a level, and I'm going to see how this all works out with a couple people on the bunks.
I'm also thinking of mounting my spare smaller anchor on the bow, so I can get some use out of it, and it will help the trim. That way I could use it as a lunch hook rather than it sitting inside the port bunk locker.

Maybe the real answer is build the boat sans the bunks, get it on the water with a level, and take your best guess from there - that would save a lot of "what-if" questions. I can see Brian's point that it would be very tough to model that and figure it out in the shop.

Another point is that we moved the anchor well bulkhead forward a few inches, and there's still plenty room in the anchor well. Further, I see no reason for a tote or basket for the rode - just flake it out on the deck. I'm going to put some small "footmans loops" on the deck and run a 1" cam strap through them, to tie the rode and chain down so it will stay put when I get into a nasty sea. In the 3+ ft chop, the chain didn't even slap once as far as I could tell.