Author Topic: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK  (Read 1366 times)

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Dan Boccia

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Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #30 on: August 27, 2018, 08:57:10 PM »
Pulled the boat out of Anthony's shop today and shoe-horned it into my back yard in Anchorage. Off to get the Suzuki 250 fly-by-wire and 9.9 hi-thrust engines hung tomorrow.

The big news is the boat weight. 3075 lb with fuel system (both tanks, fills/vents complete, fuel supplies coiled in bilge), deck cleats, anchor roller, bow eye, Seastar tilting helm and wheel, captain's seat with sliding base, dinette table and base, bilge and heater through-hulls, and a couple grab bars. Without all this, the bare hull weight would be 2784 lb, and that's with a 9 1/2 ft cabin full of cabinets, and quite a few cabinets on the back deck. I figure once everything is installed, dry, it will weigh between 4475 and 4625 lb. For comparison, Dave's 26-footer in Homer weighed 4700 lb dry and all outfitted. The weight savings comes from the foam-core we used in the cabin and parts of the cabinets, plus we stuck to the glass schedule without overbuilding anything except maybe the transom. I am thrilled with the weight, it's over 400 lb lighter than Anthony and I were figuring it would be.

We are not very impressed with the System Three paint - it gave Anthony quite a bit of trouble and seems a bit fragile. I would be hard pressed to recommend it to be honest. We called the company and worked with them to be sure we were using it correctly and they verified it was not a bad batch. I think I would go with Alex-Seal in the future, my research revealed lots of boat yards and individuals are happy with this paint, and you put up with the fumes.

Also, the Kokopelli trailer, while being some 700 lb lighter than the EZ-Loader option, has two things I'm disappointed with: One, the jack stand does not swivel because the I-beams are in the way, and two, the side bunks only attach to the outside I-beam, so they vibrate all over the place. I had to add some angles to the box beam to attach to the ends of the side bunk supports beneath the trailer, and that stiffened things up considerably at very little cost other than a few hours crawling around under the trailer.

After carting it around town for engine, upholstery measurements, and bow/roof rail measurements, it will be up to me to wire and outfit the boat. Looking forward to working on it myself!

Brian.Dixon

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Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #31 on: August 28, 2018, 06:27:33 AM »
What a beauty!  Congratulations!!!

You may be impressed with the S-III paint more as you own the boat longer - my experience has been that it's pretty tough, but it cures tissue-thin and shows every defect (which doesn't bother me any).

On the port side, what is the 'hole' midway down one side?  Vent?  Bilge pump outlet?

Brian

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Dan Boccia

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Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #32 on: August 28, 2018, 11:54:26 AM »
Brian, that thru-hull on the port side is the Wallas forced air furnace exhaust/air intake. They are strict about having a 12" drop in the stack, and since the stack topped out just below the gunnel, this is where it ended up. They said that's common, and they've never had any problems. I can imagine side slop getting into the hole occasionally, perhaps when pulling a shrimp pot in a blow or something, but they don't seem worried about it.

Off to the engine shop...

Brian.Dixon

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Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #33 on: August 28, 2018, 01:14:58 PM »
Brian, that thru-hull on the port side is the Wallas forced air furnace exhaust/air intake. They are strict about having a 12" drop in the stack, and since the stack topped out just below the gunnel, this is where it ended up. They said that's common, and they've never had any problems. I can imagine side slop getting into the hole occasionally, perhaps when pulling a shrimp pot in a blow or something, but they don't seem worried about it.

Off to the engine shop...

Gotcha ... I hadn't thought of that.  You'll enjoy that Wallas.... warm = good :D

Brian

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Rbob

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Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #34 on: August 31, 2018, 09:08:13 AM »
Dan,

Your boat looks awesome!  I just noticed you have foam on the cabin sides, bulkhead and I assume roof,  You had mentioned foam on the cuddy roof with 1/4 laminated on the top but I am curious if any wood is laminated onto the sides to the roof?

I am wanting to do foam and looking for all the info I can get.


Bob


Djeffrey

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Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #35 on: September 15, 2018, 03:54:09 PM »
Dan, can you give me an idea what the outboard and controls cost you?

Dan Boccia

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Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #36 on: September 20, 2018, 06:03:51 PM »
Sorry, missed your questions Rbob and Djeffrey...

We used 1/2" foam on the cuddy sides, forward bulkhead, cuddy top with 1/4" plywood laminated on top, cabin sides, window frames, top of aft bulkhead above the gunwales, and the roof. No extra lamination on the roof, but we did lay another layer of 10oz I think on the roof. Also used foam on almost all of the cabinet bulkheads. I love the weight savings. Costs a bit more, and is a bit more of a hassle to outfit since through bolts and washers need to be used to mount anything. In the cuddy, up high, we laminated a 2" strip of 1/2" plywood on either side so I can run screw eyes in to string up hanging lines for clothes, etc. If you think ahead, you can add bits of plywood here and there to mount things to and still get the weight savings. Also, you get some insulation value out of it, and sound deadening perhaps.

Sure, prices from Anchorage Yamaha/Suzuki:
$22,910 Suzuki DF250AP, fly by wire (electronic shift/throttle)
$3230    Suzuki DF9.9 BT, hi-thrust kicker, EFI (love that I have no carbs on board!)
$99        kicker throttle controls
$550      stainless prop for 250 -  18 x 19 (to start with, will see how it runs)
$700      computer for 250
$92        boots/rigging supplies
$1430    shop labor to hang engines, program 250, run controls, and install hydraulic steering (I supplied helm, already mounted to console)

$27,581 parts
$29,011 total

This does not include the kicker bracket I had fabricated, the Seastar tilting helm (about $700), or any of the hydraulic steering parts.
Bloody expensive, but what can you do? At least it's top shelf gear.

Dan Boccia

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Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #37 on: September 20, 2018, 06:14:10 PM »
Got the pair of Suzukis hung finally after the shop took 3 weeks to do it. Such is the way it seems to go with engine shops, sigh....
The control cables are not in their final position, just hanging there for now.

Two things of interest to builders and Brian:
1. The drywell, at 36" wide, was too narrow to allow mounting the hydraulic steering tube, so the shop had to tear the engine off, mount the tube, and re-mount. If the drywell was 40" wide it would have fit. Otherwise, there is barely adequate room in all other dimensions, so future builders planning on a 250 might want to increase drywell dimensions all around a couple inches.

2. There is no good way to connect the kicker to the main for steering. The 250 has no good place to strap on a tie-bar on its back end, and the offset is too great for a Seastar kicker cable or tie-bar on the front. This is a major disappointment to me. Thankfully, we have products such as the Panther T5 electro-steer, which is an electronic control with a little keypad to steer with. I'll mount the keypad in the cabin and be good to go hopefully. I have heard of someone tapping into the hydraulic steering, valving the lines to the kicker or the main, and just switching the valves to go between the two. Sounds like a cool creative solution, not sure how it would work, and the Panther product looks clean and simple so I'm going with that.

Now I can finish the heater installation, mount the fridge, lights, nav lights, electronics, and electrical. Bunch of work still to do!