Author Topic: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK  (Read 80 times)

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Dan Boccia

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GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« on: February 01, 2018, 10:03:37 PM »
In late November, after considerable research and examining my desires, I decided on building a GA 28 Newport. Lacking shop space and not wanting to sink money into renting space in Anchorage and spending a year or so building the boat, plus having just sold a vacant property and thus having enough funds to cover the labor, I decided to have Anthony Lyndacker of Kachemak Skiffs build the boat. In early December, Anthony and I bantered back and forth about materials. On Dec 9 he ordered materials and they were in his shop on the 19th, when he began building the scarf jig for this build. So start of the build is officially December 19. He took a 2-week break over the holidays. Today it's February 1 and he basically has the entire hull built.

My goal for this build is to go as light as possible - I'm very comfortable with the strength of the design and see no need to overbuild. In addition, since Anthony has built and repaired a bunch of Tolmans, he will be better able than many to minimize materials while still keeping the build plenty strong. Here is the status today.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frjP4kgaYQI&feature=youtu.be

Brian.Dixon

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Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2018, 06:02:17 AM »
Great overview by Anthony of Kachemak Skiffs!  In case you don't know, Anthony Lyndaker will put together a kit for you OR will build the boat for you, working with you to finish the boat to whatever level you prefer, e.g. just build the hull, or hull and decks, or go all the way and build the cabin/cuddy and finish it up for you.  Love the video... !!

Brian
The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by greenhorns -
 http://www.glacierboats.com

Dan Boccia

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Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2018, 07:21:53 PM »
Anthony has faired and sanded the bare hull twice. Note the minimal fairing compound, testament to careful and skillful carpentry, and key to keeping weight down. Next step is to glass the hull.


Brian.Dixon

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Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2018, 06:00:29 AM »
Looking Sweet!  What kind of wood is he using?  Looks like good smooth wood ... that helps a lot with the fairing too, plus of course, Anthony knows how to fast and good work at the same time.  It's going to be a nice boat :)

Brian
The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by greenhorns -
 http://www.glacierboats.com

Dan Boccia

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Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2018, 12:06:24 PM »
I decided on okoume for its light weight, which is a primary design criteria for this build. Any argument about strength seems far less important as most of the strength comes from the shape and the glass and the design details, all of which I'm very comfortable with. I'm looking forward to weighing this boat when it's fully outfitted!

Brian.Dixon

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Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2018, 05:13:05 AM »
I decided on okoume for its light weight, which is a primary design criteria for this build. Any argument about strength seems far less important as most of the strength comes from the shape and the glass and the design details, all of which I'm very comfortable with. I'm looking forward to weighing this boat when it's fully outfitted!

Yes, I love Okoume!  It makes finishing easy too since it is so smooth - the extra cost, compared to fir, is worth in when you consider the time savings in maintenance and the value of a nice looking boat.

As for those curves that Anthony mentions, they were originally drawn on paper with ships curves - Ships curves were developed over time as being curves that work well with water:

  https://www.amazon.com/Westcott-Ship-Curve-Set-SC-66/dp/B000HEOHVC?SubscriptionId=AKIAILSHYYTFIVPWUY6Q&tag=duckduckgo-d-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B000HEOHVC


Just a little trivia I guess...

Brian
The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by greenhorns -
 http://www.glacierboats.com

Dan Boccia

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Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2018, 12:41:42 AM »
Entire outside of hull is now glassed, sides have been faired/sanded twice, bottom faired once. One layer of Kevlar installed on transom engine mount area for extra toughness. Just saw the boat in person for the first time today (have been out of town since the build started) and found out this is Anthony's 17th boat build! Of interest he mixes all his epoxy by hand having found the big metering pumps too fussy to keep clean, spreads his epoxy with the small yellow squeegees for the most part, and obviously he has a system and moves steadily. 

Brian.Dixon

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Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2018, 07:32:52 AM »
I gave up on pumps too.  What I do instead is the 'cup in a cup' method:

- Drop one (typ. SOLO brand) plastic cup into another, and look through the side of the cups, eyeballing how much hardener you want inside the inside cup - make a Sharpie line at that level and put an 'H' (hardener) next to it.

- Pour water into the inside cup - carefully to the line that you made.  Dump this water into another plastic cup.  Do this again so that the other plastic cup has twice the water in it than the 'hardener' cup.

- Put a new plastic up inside the marked up, fill to the 'H' mark, then pour the contents of the other cup (the one with a double charge of water in it) into it ... Now make a mark at the water level and label it 'H+R' (1 measure of hardener, 2 measures of resin).

To mix a batch of epoxy, drop a clean cup into the marked cup, pour hardener into it up to the 'H' line, then add resin until it's full to the 'H+R' line.  You now have a 2:1 resin/hardener ratio in your clean cup.  Stir it up and use it.  The marked cup is ready for another batch ... never mucked up with epoxy and ready to be re-used.  I actually built a little stand for my bench top so that the cups would be pretty close to eye-level as I poured hardener/resin into the clean (inner) cup.

The above is NOT my invention or trick ... but I don't remember where I first saw it either :) :(

Brian

The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by greenhorns -
 http://www.glacierboats.com

Cannon

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Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2018, 10:43:36 AM »
I use a method relayed to me by Oyster on the Fishy Fish forum. He does a lot of boat work and as such has some pretty good tips when it comes to epoxy.
I use the large yogurt containers and initially, I mark one them on the outside with a black felt pen. I fill first with water using a measuring cup to the two part level and mark. The amount of epoxy you feel comfortable using determines how much of each, the faster I got at applying it, the larger the mix. Then I add the one part level and mark by adding the appropriate amount of water. Once this is done, I cut a bunch of lath into six or eight in pieces. I have lots of hardwood scrap that I used for this purpose, cut about an eighth of an inch thick and about 3/4 wide. I stick one into the cup less the water and make a mark at both levels using a black felt pen.
Next I use the initial measure stick and a tri-square to transfer that mark onto five or six other measure sticks at a time. I make up around twenty or more at a time.
I use laundry detergent jugs for both my resin and for my hardener marked appropriately. Place one of the measure sticks in the yogurt container, dump in the resin to the first mark, then dump in the hardener to the second mark on the measure stick. Fast, efficient and accurate. If you wipe of the measure stick in between uses, you can use them over and over again.
The yogurt containers work great, and you can use them over and over until they finally crack. By slightly crushing the container the next day, you dislodge the set up epoxy and can easily pull it from the container.
Remember, the ark was built by amateurs; the Titanic was built by professionals.
Started building Paula J the 2nd Week of June 2015, finished her the second week of July 2016.

Brian.Dixon

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Re: GA 28 built by Kachemak Skiffs Wasilla, AK
« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2018, 11:36:03 AM »
I like the measuring sticks solution - It lets you re-use any container you want, even if it is not clear.  Thanks Kent....

Brian

The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by greenhorns -
 http://www.glacierboats.com