Author Topic: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build  (Read 17448 times)

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Rbob

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #300 on: June 12, 2018, 07:33:00 PM »
Simple it is, a little ways down the road but always thinking ahead.

I just finished the the remaining side of the stringer so on to some sheer decks and the crash chamber.

Thank you!

Bob

Cannon

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #301 on: June 16, 2018, 08:17:35 AM »
RBOB,
I used 1/2 inch marine ply for the deck over the anchor well. And it is more than adequate. The cuddy roof is 1/4Ē and it gives a bit. I think if I were to do it again I would possibly go 3/8 for the cuddy roof. You donít get up on the cuddy a lot, or maybe that is just me. But after adding the railing I am sure that will change...sneaking up on albies and casting jigs is in my future!
Remember, the ark was built by amateurs; the Titanic was built by professionals.
Started building Paula J the 2nd Week of June 2015, finished her the second week of July 2016.

Rbob

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #302 on: June 16, 2018, 08:48:21 AM »
Cannon,

Hope to see some pics of your albies soon, I love tuna fishing.  I have been out only 4-5 times wit my 22' Raider and had a blast when the weather cooperated.  Best was flat calm and 35mph for 1 1/2 hr run, another time we ran 2 1/2hrs at 12mph and gave up.  Hopefully I will be ready next summer but I know there is a lot to do.

I will be adding a similar railing,  not as nimble or brave as I used to be.


Rbob

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #303 on: June 16, 2018, 08:57:25 AM »
Brian,

On the center of gravity, not sure how this changes when adding a motor and a kicker.  I have your calcs and I assume it is a bare hull with a cabin or maybe without a cabin.  My fuel tank I will install slightly behind center of gravity If that is the best.

Is it possible to figure center of gravity with a motor and kicker weight in the calculation?

 

Brian.Dixon

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #304 on: June 16, 2018, 12:56:31 PM »

You'll find that the boat is forgiving of where the CG lands.  If you aim for having the CG of the fuel tanks just behind the aft pilot house bulkhead or so, your usual array of motors will work fine.  For building an open house-less version of the boat, that's new territory and I suggest building the hull and decks, following the drawing for center console framing, then use sand bags to represent various items (motors, fuel, people, gear, any other tankage, any batteries and appliances etc) and then move them around until you've got the bow trimming 1 to 1-1/2 inches high versus the stern.  Use an angle measurer (below) or a bevel and level to take an approximate angle off the deck and then apply a bit of trigonometry to figure out the trim... I can help with that.  I'd calculate the upslope angle right now but am headed off to the Home Despot....

Magnetic Protractor

Brian
The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by greenhorns -
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Rbob

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #305 on: June 18, 2018, 10:09:11 PM »
A little more progress, I made the collision chamber bulkhead and glassed the inside face and will install tomorrow:

I tried the tick stick but seemed like way too much work so I went with your tried and true method with door skin and traced the perimeter with a pencil compass.


Brian.Dixon

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #306 on: June 19, 2018, 05:21:44 AM »
Looking good!  Have you tried the sander method for trimming glass off the edges of the plywood?  On anything that's going to end up in a seam or under epoxy, you just take a random orbital w/80-grit on it and run it around the edge of the plywood, holding the sander a about 45 degrees.  Peels the excess right off!

Brian
The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by greenhorns -
 http://www.glacierboats.com

Rbob

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #307 on: June 21, 2018, 01:07:31 PM »
Yes that sander works great.  I have the collision chamber bulkhead installed, fillets and taped exterior seam with drain plug..  I have fit the tops and have to glue them down. 

You are right, lots of work without a lot of progress showing...


Cannon

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #308 on: June 21, 2018, 06:34:51 PM »
Looks good! This is the stage where it seems ninety percent of the work is. Not really, but it sure seems that way! This phase is probably the most important, because you determine how everything that goes below deck will fit and still give you the ability to change and upgrade your wiring and hoses.
It seems to go on forever, but you are almost there! Keep at it and soon it is Big Blue!
Remember, the ark was built by amateurs; the Titanic was built by professionals.
Started building Paula J the 2nd Week of June 2015, finished her the second week of July 2016.

Rbob

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #309 on: June 21, 2018, 08:21:50 PM »
Thanks Cannon,

Yes the thinking stage begins, thinking about the windlass, and the bulkheads for the anchor locker, aft cuddy and pilot house. 
I have my windlass and bow roller and 500' of rode, almost 2k in anchor stuff!

I am going to make my anchor well bulkhead sit all the way down on the crash chamber for plenty of drop for the vertical windlass, should be plenty.

Making the flush sheer deck tomorrow which got me thinking about the pulpit.  I am not sure how far to extend it, I may incorporate the sheer deck as part of the pulpit support with 3/4" plywood laminated on the underside on the extension part of it, what do you think?

I did get more done today, I cut out and added blocking for a 6" inspection hatch and glassed it at the same time while installing the crash chamber tops.  The bottom side of the crash chamber and support is glassed with 6oz and 2 coats of epoxy prior to install.

Some pics:


Brian.Dixon

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #310 on: June 22, 2018, 08:31:15 AM »
... Looking forward, how do you plan on painting the interior?  Do you have a good air compressor that has enough flow to drive an HVLP any-position type 'detail gun'?  Every time that I paint something detailed like the interior of a boat, I always wished for one ... but I've been too cheap to buy one.

Brian

PS: Progress is looking great!  As for all that thinking ... well, this is where the boat becomes YOUR CUSTOM BOAT ... not some float-tel designed to please Mr. AverageKnowNothing.  Enjoy the journey and don't worry too much about the clock....

The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by greenhorns -
 http://www.glacierboats.com

Rbob

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #311 on: June 22, 2018, 08:59:37 PM »
I have not thought that far out yet, but I do have HVLP guns and a 5hp 2-stage Ingersol Rand and my shop is setup with correct air line runs, up to rafters and slight fall 50' to air dryer and back across the whole shop with airlines t'eed off the top of the lines and drop down to wall mounted couplings / hose reels.  No moisture at all!

I could always take it to my work and do it there on the weekend but it would not fit in the paint booth anyway so it would have to be a makeshift extension on the paint booth so... I have years experience painting cars and the boat is a lot bigger but that is what pressure pots are for.

  I finished taping the collision chamber and going to set the anchor well bulkhead on top of the crash chamber,

Directions say 1/4" but this will be quite a bit taller so you think I should step up to 3/8" for anchor well bulkhead?  Its about 36" tall so 1/4" might be too thin..

Going to have to put in a drain for the anchor locker to the bilge, too low to drain out the side now.


 

Brian.Dixon

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #312 on: June 24, 2018, 07:43:23 AM »

On painting, I figure that if you make it easier to do, then you'll likely do a better job.  I think a quality detail gun is worth owning and it sounds like you've got the perfect setup for it.  Just paint before putting windows in so you can drag the hose in from any direction  you want.

On your tall aft anchor well 'bulkhead', yeah, I think I'd go with 3/8".  As for draining the anchor well, I'm not a fan of adding water to the bilge, especially if you've got aluminum belly tanks ... but alternatives would either mean piping (hose or PVC?) it to the stern bilge or letting it drain outside the sides of the boat and use plugs when underway?   Dunno... lots of ways to skin the cat.  I doubt you'll want to sponge it out all the time, so some type of natural draining would be good.  Same goes for ventilation to dry the anchor rode.
The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by greenhorns -
 http://www.glacierboats.com

Rbob

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #313 on: June 27, 2018, 12:36:19 AM »
Modifications adds a ton of time to the build!  I will figure out the ventilation for the  anchor locker so it will dry out.

How much water do you think can come in thru the windlass?  Dumb question considering if I let out 200' of rope it will be wet when it comes in.  Maybe draining into the bilge will be my only option.

 

   

Brian.Dixon

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #314 on: June 27, 2018, 07:13:06 AM »
Modifications adds a ton of time to the build!  I will figure out the ventilation for the  anchor locker so it will dry out.

How much water do you think can come in thru the windlass?  Dumb question considering if I let out 200' of rope it will be wet when it comes in.  Maybe draining into the bilge will be my only option.   

Another option is to put a small bilge pump inside the crash chamber and let the wet anchor line drip into that (open it and sponge it out after you're back and the boat is back home).  Even if you filled the whole chamber to the brim, the boat will carry the bow weight no problem, but give thought to how you can close the opening if you need to.  There is no serious source of water on top of a flush (or arched) bow deck ... spray, rain.  It's good to close it off if you're leaving the boat unattended for weeks at a time.  But you won't see any waves making it over that bow - very rare if it ever occurs. Hmm... as for the bilge pump, you could even build a small bilge pump chamber at the top of the crash chamber that the anchor rode chamber can drip into ... that would shorten the rise from the pump to the drain (out the side of the boat up higher).  Just thinking out loud here ... there's always a solution.  You just have to pick one and get with it, done!

Brian
The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by greenhorns -
 http://www.glacierboats.com