Author Topic: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build  (Read 16574 times)

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Brian.Dixon

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #270 on: April 10, 2018, 09:54:20 AM »
Nice ... where'd you find those couplers?

bd
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Rbob

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #271 on: April 10, 2018, 10:32:04 AM »
Ebay!

Brian.Dixon

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #272 on: April 11, 2018, 03:25:52 PM »
The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by greenhorns -
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Rbob

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #273 on: April 11, 2018, 03:44:23 PM »
Brian,

Thinking ahead about the "limbers", the manual says all bulkheads limbered to drain aft to the bilge area except for the fuel tank compartment.  How does water flow around the fuel tank?

I believe any water from anchor / windlace locker will drain into the hull and travel aft until it hits the bulkhead for the fuel tank, then what?

   

Brian.Dixon

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #274 on: April 12, 2018, 08:38:19 AM »
Thinking ahead about the "limbers", the manual says all bulkheads limbered to drain aft to the bilge area except for the fuel tank compartment.  How does water flow around the fuel tank?

I believe any water from anchor / windlace locker will drain into the hull and travel aft until it hits the bulkhead for the fuel tank, then what?

Hey ... good question and great illustration!  I should make this more clear in the manual.

Ok, so first ... why keep water away from fuel tanks?  Well, perhaps I didn't make my 'aluminum tank' assumption clear!  You really want to avoid standing water in or on or around aluminum tanks.  That includes water that is 'trapped by capillary action' between two surfaces, one of which is your aluminum tank.  This will absolutely eventually cause tank failure / leaking.  My aluminum tank assumption is based on the idea that while you can find off-the-shelf tanks for the aft belly tank, the forward belly tank span will likely be a custom tank, e.g. welded aluminum.  This is because the forward end of the tank is going to be shallower than the aft end of the tank and I doubt you can build a tank (reliably) with something like poly welding and plastic etc.  Using an off-the-shelf tank for the forward position will likely limit your fuel capacity.  Some people choose to paint the aluminum tanks with something like Zinc Chromate Primer by Moeller and then with a good submersible-grade non-ablative paint ('hard bottom paint') before installation of the tank.  This will add a LOT of relatively cheap and easy insurance that'll help guarantee a good long life for aluminum tanks.  Combine that with preventative measures such as allowing for drainage out from under tanks and for preventing water collection on the surface of the tank, and you're in like Flynn.... be proud!

Alright, so much for homework ... back to the under-deck drainage questions.  First, I do recommend that you CAN drain water through the fuel tank compartments but you should do so only if a) you can plug the limbers to prevent it (boat plugs and 15/16" round limbers), and b) you have provided some sort of access and/or ventilation that'll help dry out even the capillary-action trapped water that might be in the tank compartments somewhere.  Easier done that said.  For this reason, even without limbers into the fuel tank compartments, I suggest always providing good ventilation - even if only used when the boat is in dry storage.

Another approach is to block water from the fuel compartments and just sponge out whatever collects outside the bulkheads.  Or, provide ventilation together with f'w'd bilge pumps to move water out of those areas where it can be trapped ... either to an area that *does* drain, or over the side.  Thinking ahead and providing access is key.  On one boat that I had, the 'access' was a small deck plate and I could 'just barely' fit a Shop Vac hose down in there to suck out the water that collected, and then I'd duct tape a cloth on a broomstick to reach in and 'sponge out' the remaining bits of water.  When you build your own boat, you can do better than that, right?  :)

Brian

« Last Edit: April 12, 2018, 08:42:09 AM by Brian.Dixon »
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Rbob

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #275 on: April 30, 2018, 02:33:10 PM »
Brian,
I finished up the bottom graphite coating, I made 12oz batches adding 2 oz each of graphite and milled carbon fiber and a couple teaspoons of fumed silica, I applied 3 coats.  Then I sanded down with #320, #600 & #800 to a smooth chalkboard type finish.  Its feels really smooth and has a nice sheen.  I am ready to flip just need to move some stuff around in preparation.  Off shrimping next weekend so if I cant get it flipped this week it will be when I get back.

 

Brian.Dixon

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #276 on: May 01, 2018, 06:40:20 AM »
Looking really good!  I like the idea of sanding down to finer grits like that, and the resulting chalkboard type finish.  It looks great!

Is your boat 28 feet PLUS the bracket-ish extension on the stern, or is that INCLUDING the extension?

Brian
The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by greenhorns -
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Rbob

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #277 on: May 01, 2018, 07:35:39 AM »
Brian,

Its 28' including the extension which isn't really an extension rather a low profile transom.   ;D

Brian.Dixon

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #278 on: May 01, 2018, 08:10:39 AM »
Brian,

Its 28' including the extension which isn't really an extension rather a low profile transom.   ;D

Got it.  I forget ... it's been awhile.  Is there a swim step type platform on the 'low profile transom not-an-extension :D '?

Thx,
Brian

The Great Alaskan - Professional grade offshore performance - Designed to be built by greenhorns -
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Dudley

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #279 on: May 01, 2018, 10:54:43 AM »
Dear Bob,
Thanks for explaining such great work with the pictures. I have purchased the plans recently and will start building the GA in Istanbul. One picture is equal to thousand words. Because I also have language barier on boat building idioms, I have been able to understand the most of the process. Also you are doing it almost what I am planning to do with a minor difference. I am planning to build the boat 330-9/16". This is the maximum length I can get by using the local plywood length in optimum placement with the scarfing. After understanding the full concept I will do a solidworks drawing so to double check everything. I am planning to add same type of swimplatform (transom hang?) where we can install double outboard and utilise for swimming. I am looking forward to see how you will tackle the entrance from the transom.
Good luck on your work,
Sacit

Rbob

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #280 on: May 01, 2018, 10:59:37 PM »
Sacit,

Thank you for the kind words, I look forward to your build. 

Tonight I built the cradles to support the boat after the flip, just as Brian shows in the manual.  My jig is on casters and my plan is to flip the jig also and mount the casters on the 6"x6" legs that are flush to the top of the jig so it will be pretty low and still be able to move around if necessary.


Rbob

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #281 on: May 01, 2018, 11:02:31 PM »
Actually it will sit a little lower than I though since the legs are not quite flush to the top of the jig:


Rbob

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #282 on: May 03, 2018, 06:49:25 PM »
I flipped it today!  Here are some pics, I am super happy...  Just me and my wife and grand daughter.   I do have a short video but I am in a big darn hurry to go shrimping.  Enjoy:


Todd j

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #283 on: May 03, 2018, 09:15:17 PM »
Somehow?  That has to be cheating!

Brian.Dixon

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Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Reply #284 on: May 04, 2018, 06:40:35 AM »
Congratulations on your flip!!!  It's BIG, isn't it?  :)

I like that statement ... "Just me, my wife, and granddaughter .... and a BACKHOE!!!!".  LOL....

Brian

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