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Several points ... first, the glass that'll be on either side of the joint has very high tensile strength that would prevent such a breakage, so not to worry.

Second, it's hard to judge the situation from my perspective.  For example, tests that I've done (and others have done) have failed to break the joint and breaks occurred on either side of the joint instead.  So why did yours break in the joint itself?  Dunno ... the possibilities are many.  Dust, sanded instead of planed scarfing (sanding seals wood cells, cutting leaves them open to wick epoxy into them).   Was each surface of the joint precoated carefully, repeatedly (brush) until the whole joint remained wet looking after letting it sit for 10 minutes?  This guarantees that the epoxy has wicked into the wood cells as far as it'll go.  Was the joint then filled with thickened epoxy right away or after the epoxy that you used to saturate the joint has cured?  Right away is best.  How thick was the thickened epoxy?  It needs to be soft enough to flow well inside the joint as it's pressed together, thereby acting as a gap-filling mix.  If the epoxy is too thick (too dry) and combined with not enough saturation of the wood cells prior to assembly, then it's possible that the wood itself drew epoxy out of the joint, leaving a too-dry mixture behind - which will be weaker.  Was the joint pressed together hard enough to squeeze all the epoxy out of some areas?  And for full strength, the epoxy should be kept warm (room temperature) and allowed to cure for at least a week before testing.  Hard to say.  I prefer to use a plane to cut scarf joint (no sanding), vacuum the dust out of each face of the joint, saturate very well before gluing, use a soft silica/wood flour mix for the gluing, and I want to see squeeze-out around the whole joint, but leave it loose enough that you know you're not squeezing all the epoxy out.  I avoid stressing the joint at all until it's been glassed.

To fix a busted joint, scrape and/or sand to remove all lumpy epoxy remains until the glue faces are smooth again, then plane off a little more to open up the wood cells, vacuum well, then saturate and glue as described.  Don't stress the joint until well cured and handle it gently until you can get some glass on it.  If no time to glass the whole thing, then just glass a 12" to 18" long strip of glass tape over the joint on each side and that'll reinforce it until you finish glassing later.

Hope that helps :)

Brian
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Got the chine flats put up tonight.  They turned out fine.  I tried to see how strong a bottom panel scarf was after 5 days on the scarfing table.  Not a strong as I wanted it to be! 
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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Mat or no mat
« Last post by Brian.Dixon on February 13, 2019, 02:14:48 PM »

:D

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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Mat or no mat
« Last post by Todd j on February 13, 2019, 12:51:22 PM »
True story.  Product on the way!
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It bought ebond.  They use r and l carriers.  The local carrier I already forgot about.  Fiberglass supply is who I am buying the glass and fillers from.  Barry at ebond seems to be the go to guy.  He is not who I initially dealt with,  but I ultimately did get ahold of him for some technical q and a stuff that the original sales guy couldnít help with.  I would say donít deal with anyone except Barry.  He was also name dropped on the other forum.

Good to know.  I've heard Barry's name elsewhere as well....

Brian

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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Mat or no mat
« Last post by Brian.Dixon on February 13, 2019, 11:50:07 AM »
Yup,   No answer.  Straight to voicemail.

I just called Fiberglass Supply - They answered right off, said that due to the heavy snow, that it's been a little hit and miss over there and they've been under staffed.  Try again today....

PS: I've never had any kind of customer support issues with them (in 15 years of doing business with them).  I'm sure they're being accurate when they mention snow related issues .... the western Washington area has been going through a lot of difficulties with these last couple of storms.

Brian

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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Mat or no mat
« Last post by Todd j on February 13, 2019, 06:43:45 AM »
Yup,   No answer.  Straight to voicemail.
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It bought ebond.  They use r and l carriers.  The local carrier I already forgot about.  Fiberglass supply is who I am buying the glass and fillers from.  Barry at ebond seems to be the go to guy.  He is not who I initially dealt with,  but I ultimately did get ahold of him for some technical q and a stuff that the original sales guy couldnít help with.  I would say donít deal with anyone except Barry.  He was also name dropped on the other forum. 
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Man, it seems like the better the Economy seems, the crappier service gets.  My epoxy was lost for 5 days in a whse in Atlanta.  Then that carrier passed it off to a local carrier that never delivered it.  After kicking rocks all day I called them to find they did deliver it, with a signature.  Just so happens it wasnít me who signed, and they didnít deliver it to the address on the bill of lading.   Now for whatever reason I canít get ahold of my fiberglass  supplier.   No one answers the phone and email can take days and Iím too dumb to find what I need on thier website.  End of rant

What brand epoxy, what dealer, what delivery services?  Might help someone else to know.... sux, guy.  Sorry to hear about all the hassles.... that's definitely not normal.

Brian

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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Mat or no mat
« Last post by Brian.Dixon on February 13, 2019, 04:59:32 AM »
I did a search and couldnít find any references to that product.  I tried to call them and there was a voicemail only.  Strange?!  I was hoping to have some on hand this weekend.  Whatís another week right

Fiberglass Supply?  Did you call their main number?  509-493-3464  http://www.fiberglasssupply.com

They definitely carry milled glass fiber...

Brian
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