Recent Posts

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I got my air bubbles on the transom filled with epoxy.  Got the shelves off the jig and and readied it for the bottom.  Did a little cleaning in the shop too. I bought a half dozen HF clamps for the build.   Maybe tomorrow I will get the bottom stitched and opened up!

Yeah ... and you know what happens next, right?  All those big flat pieces of wood that you've been man-handling around are suddenly going to be shaped like a big giant boat in your shop!  It's one of my favorite parts of the build!  (Other than sanding .... boy do I love sanding  :o)

Brian

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I got my air bubbles on the transom filled with epoxy.  Got the shelves off the jig and and readied it for the bottom.  Did a little cleaning in the shop too. I bought a half dozen HF clamps for the build.   Maybe tomorrow I will get the bottom stitched and opened up!
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Sounds good.  Thanks

No problem ... I've done a little glassing that looked just like that myself!  It'll work!  :)

Brian

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Sounds good.  Thanks
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Without being there to make sure, I would say it looks a little low on the epoxy saturation.  It's likely that the underlying wood soaked up some of the epoxy in the glass while it was beginning to cure.  Generally, when that happens, it'll be drier on the surface of the fiberglass because the epoxy migrates from outside to inside if the wood's soaking it up.  The way to prevent this is to roll on plenty of epoxy when glassing, wait 15 minutes or so and roll on more wherever the weave of the glass is starting to show too much.  For THIS epoxy work, a boat like the Great Alaskan, we are NOT trying to finesse the glassing so that it only has exactly the most perfect amount of resin in the glass ... leave that for the America's Cup boats.  Having extra epoxy is fine.  Glass generally will not float off the wood if you've rolled or squeegee'd from the center outward, which stretches the glass a bit. 

In your case below, sand it lightly with 80-grit, wipe it down with ammonia water and let dry, then put a healthy coat of epoxy on it and move on... all is well.  If the weave is showing after that, roll another coat of epoxy on.  You want it to end up fairly glossy, but it's not necessary for the epoxy to fill the weave to the point of smoothness either.  Extra epoxy below decks is never a bad thing, regardless.

Keep on truckin'.....

Brian

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Should I expect my glass work to look like this?   I know that it wAs wet.  I did the job wet on wet.  Is this air trapped ?
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Announcements / Re: NAME the New Big & Wide Great Alaskan!
« Last post by Brian.Dixon on March 22, 2019, 09:38:49 AM »
First place is Kodiak, second is Pacific King.  Tied for third is Grizzly and Denali ... anyone else?  I'm going to combine the top 2 names for the 2nd (and last) poll ... Kodiak King :)
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Announcements / Re: Big & Wide addendum coming
« Last post by fishon78 on March 21, 2019, 11:37:35 AM »
I do like the "Kodiak". I'll throw in the Aleutian.   
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Better safe than sorry!  Bonding (keeping everything at ground potential) also helps prevent corrosion.  Even though these boats are wood and glass, not metal, it's worthwhile to own and read Nigel Warren's book, Metal Corrosion in Boats too.

Brian
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A day of going backwards to bond the fuel fill fittings and fuel tanks. Bonding these items is both required by code and makes perfectly good common sense. I've heard the call on the radio about someone's boat catching on fire, and I'm trying to avoid that through careful wiring.

Carefully found the underfloor sub-stringers with a stud-finder and measurements, successfully hole-sawed into each tank compartment, tapped the supporting lip of the tank without hitting wood or the tank, and bonded the tanks using a 1/4" bolt and #12 wire, using conductive grease just to be on the safe side, and 2 layers of heat shrink wherever the wire went through a bulkhead. Mixed up some thick epoxy and used just enough to get the plug to stick, trying to avoid dripping any epoxy onto the tank and wires. I'll fill the remaining gaps and center holes tomorrow, and eventually smooth it all out and touch it up with the deck paint. Good enough, very happy to be done with this unhappy job.

For the fuel fill, I took out one of the screws, used a long bolt, and set it with conductive grease rather than a dab of sealant so as to repel water while still getting good electrical conduction between the bolt and tank fill. Bonded the bottom of the bolt and ran it back to the bonding/grounding bus.

With all this back-work done, I anticipate some serious forward progress in the next couple weeks. Mostly electrical and electronics. Just keep drilling holes in the boat, eventually it will get done!
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