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Got the pair of Suzukis hung finally after the shop took 3 weeks to do it. Such is the way it seems to go with engine shops, sigh....
The control cables are not in their final position, just hanging there for now.

Two things of interest to builders and Brian:
1. The drywell, at 36" wide, was too narrow to allow mounting the hydraulic steering tube, so the shop had to tear the engine off, mount the tube, and re-mount. If the drywell was 40" wide it would have fit. Otherwise, there is barely adequate room in all other dimensions, so future builders planning on a 250 might want to increase drywell dimensions all around a couple inches.

2. There is no good way to connect the kicker to the main for steering. The 250 has no good place to strap on a tie-bar on its back end, and the offset is too great for a Seastar kicker cable or tie-bar on the front. This is a major disappointment to me. Thankfully, we have products such as the Panther T5 electro-steer, which is an electronic control with a little keypad to steer with. I'll mount the keypad in the cabin and be good to go hopefully. I have heard of someone tapping into the hydraulic steering, valving the lines to the kicker or the main, and just switching the valves to go between the two. Sounds like a cool creative solution, not sure how it would work, and the Panther product looks clean and simple so I'm going with that.

Now I can finish the heater installation, mount the fridge, lights, nav lights, electronics, and electrical. Bunch of work still to do!
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Sorry, missed your questions Rbob and Djeffrey...

We used 1/2" foam on the cuddy sides, forward bulkhead, cuddy top with 1/4" plywood laminated on top, cabin sides, window frames, top of aft bulkhead above the gunwales, and the roof. No extra lamination on the roof, but we did lay another layer of 10oz I think on the roof. Also used foam on almost all of the cabinet bulkheads. I love the weight savings. Costs a bit more, and is a bit more of a hassle to outfit since through bolts and washers need to be used to mount anything. In the cuddy, up high, we laminated a 2" strip of 1/2" plywood on either side so I can run screw eyes in to string up hanging lines for clothes, etc. If you think ahead, you can add bits of plywood here and there to mount things to and still get the weight savings. Also, you get some insulation value out of it, and sound deadening perhaps.

Sure, prices from Anchorage Yamaha/Suzuki:
$22,910 Suzuki DF250AP, fly by wire (electronic shift/throttle)
$3230    Suzuki DF9.9 BT, hi-thrust kicker, EFI (love that I have no carbs on board!)
$99        kicker throttle controls
$550      stainless prop for 250 -  18 x 19 (to start with, will see how it runs)
$700      computer for 250
$92        boots/rigging supplies
$1430    shop labor to hang engines, program 250, run controls, and install hydraulic steering (I supplied helm, already mounted to console)

$27,581 parts
$29,011 total

This does not include the kicker bracket I had fabricated, the Seastar tilting helm (about $700), or any of the hydraulic steering parts.
Bloody expensive, but what can you do? At least it's top shelf gear.
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Dan, can you give me an idea what the outboard and controls cost you?
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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Last post by Rbob on September 09, 2018, 09:15:30 PM »
Cannon,

Just re-read your post, I get it, you were referring to the windshield panel.

 ;D
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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Last post by Rbob on September 09, 2018, 09:12:11 PM »
Cannon,

Do you mean 1/2" plywood on the deck or the pulpit is made out of 1/2" ?

I thought you had some kind of hardwood on top for pulpit, I like the look and if mine does not seem strong enough I will add something on top.

I did not get done what I wanted to, I have windshield skins mocked up and supports ready for the roof templates to mark the windshield skins but ran out of gas. 



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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Last post by Cannon on September 09, 2018, 11:02:30 AM »
Brian,
I like that support, I am going to use that.  Off to the shop going to get windshield panels and roof mockup done.

I been thinking (haha) I plan on using 1/2" for the windshield panels rather than 1/4" with 1/4" doubler, might be easier for me.

Bob
I used 1/2 inch for mine. Worked great!
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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Last post by Rbob on September 09, 2018, 09:52:50 AM »
Brian,
I like that support, I am going to use that.  Off to the shop going to get windshield panels and roof mockup done.

I been thinking (haha) I plan on using 1/2" for the windshield panels rather than 1/4" with 1/4" doubler, might be easier for me.

Bob
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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Bob from Olympia, 28 GA build
« Last post by Brian.Dixon on September 09, 2018, 07:58:16 AM »
Referring to the attachment....

The direction of force on the pulpit is up and down (curved arrow).  If you want to use glass between layers (or right on top) to strengthen it, noting that fiberglass has very high tensile strength in the direction of the  yarn, you'd want to orient the glass so that the yarn runs fore/aft.  Biaxial is fine, but there isn't much twisting force on the pulpit.  You could go either way.

For your pulpit, I'd probably glass the top with some leftover 10-oz and orient the cloth so (half of) the yarn runs fore/aft... it'll give abrasion resistance as well and there's no need to introduce the extra fairing required by biax (unless between layers of wood, assembled while wet/soft or wet-on-wet under woven glass on top).

It's never a bad idea to put a knee underneath the pulpit as well.  The worst and highest forces will occur in a downward direction on the pulpit while anchored, e.g. a caught anchor and a big wave lifting the boat.  The knee will transfer loads to the stem and that's a good idea ... plus it looks cool :)

Looking good!

Brian

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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Photo gallery
« Last post by Brian.Dixon on September 09, 2018, 07:35:40 AM »
They think it's fiberglass because your boat looks very professionally done and 99% of the fiberglass boats on the planet are white :)

Looks huge sitting in the water like that ... awesome!

Brian

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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Photo gallery
« Last post by twisted1 on September 08, 2018, 09:39:43 PM »
Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival,  we had to show her off this one time. Soooooo many people mistake her for a fiberglass boat.... hahaha
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