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Itís not cast iron yet.  Yes it would be for the flip. I might get a pile of 6x6x1/2  Ibeam. Itís way overkill,  it itís free to me.... maybe. This stuff is 25# per foot and my shop is 20 feet wide.  I donít trust the structure to hold the the beam.  If I did I would use it to flip the hull.  If your Interested read my ďa house for a GA ď thread here.  It chronicles my dogshit to honey boat shed Reno/build.   

Right, ya, I read that towards the end of when you were doing it. Now that I remember you also have those canted beams too, so ya, attaching a 500lb beam to those guys doesn't sound very safe haha. I was going to use my cranes that I built to do my flip but then realized that my hull won't fit under them on it's side. So 10 dudes + pizza and beer sounds like it's going to be the way for me.
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Most people with curved transoms just make a wedge-shaped piece for left/right sides of the bracket to give the bracket a flat surface to bolt against.  Good idea to use the same inside so the bolts/washers are tightened against a flat surface as well.

Brian

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After measuring a couple outboards and some more noodling and one more bonking my noggin I cut the stringers off flush with the transom.  I think I will mount my kicker on the transom as well.  I intend to put a platform on the starboard side with a tubular kicker/brace to support the aft end from the transom.  One great thing about this construction method is the ability to to about anything without too much disruption in the build process.  Thanks to all that played along!

Yup, you can bolt a swim platform onto the boat too ... no need to use the stringers.  Just follow the instructions in the manual on transom weight, including the down-grading of motor weight for bracket length and weight.  Gotta keep the CG in the right window.  I know of one guy who didn't, regretted it, fixed it .. that costs extra money and doesn't make anyone happy!

Brian
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After measuring a couple outboards and some more noodling and one more bonking my noggin I cut the stringers off flush with the transom.  I think I will mount my kicker on the transom as well.  I intend to put a platform on the starboard side with a tubular kicker/brace to support the aft end from the transom.  One great thing about this construction method is the ability to to about anything without too much disruption in the build process.  Thanks to all that played along!
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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Photo gallery
« Last post by twisted1 on July 15, 2019, 05:30:51 PM »
We built in a bulkhead for the anchor locker in the very forward area and have access to the rode and chain from inside the Vbirth. We angled the floor of the locker to drain water to either side of the boat. We copied the Seasport we own.
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First ahh poop. Wanted a flat spot to mount the engine so I carver out a piece of plywood and mounted it to the transom. Hated how it looked so took it off before epoxy cured. Decided I will deal with the curve when I mount the jack plate. No biggie.😜
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Been working on rails. Decided to cover them all with 4 inch glass. Didnít like the idea of unglased wood below the water line
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Last electrical item completed (other than solar system, which will be later) - wiring the forward deck lights. Marine Beam usually provides a long cable with their lights, but in this case I had to run a cable above the roof and make the splice outside, which I'm not a big fan of. In case anyone wonders how to seal wires through the roof, I have been using these wire seals from Scanstrut which I like a lot. Other brands make similar offerings. First you drill your hole for your cable, then mount the base of the cable seal, then run the wire through the hole, make the connection with heat-shrink butt connectors (in this case a step-down butt connector from my 16 gauge to 20 gauge from the light), seal the whole works with adhesive heat-shrink, so it grips the virgin cable on both ends, then place the split-rubber gasket, secure the top over the gasket and you have a leak-free assembly. Finally I used a zip-tie base and zip ties to anchor the cable. Should be a trouble-free installation.

Fired up the electronics and realized I have not connected the sonar, and further realized I don't have the sonar cable and there are none in town so that probably means no depth-sounder or fish-finder on the first outing next week, bummer! Going to have to run careful, following the charts, to stay off the bottom.
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Itís not cast iron yet.  Yes it would be for the flip. I might get a pile of 6x6x1/2  Ibeam. Itís way overkill,  it itís free to me.... maybe. This stuff is 25# per foot and my shop is 20 feet wide.  I donít trust the structure to hold the the beam.  If I did I would use it to flip the hull.  If your Interested read my ďa house for a GA ď thread here.  It chronicles my dogshit to honey boat shed Reno/build.   
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I decided to go pour unthickened epoxy right on the bottom.  Squeegee it all over the boat.  Sides too.  Then glass and treat the hull. Kick the whole thing outside for awhile and build a couple gantry cranes. Then resume the build again inside.  I wonder if just epoxy coating the bottom and leaving it untended for the duration of the summer would accomplish the same thing if itís rained upon.

I would feel a lot better about my project sitting outside if it was coated. However I can see from chunks of epoxy that have been sitting in the sun that they start to get pretty weathered pretty fast in direct sunlight. Interesting that you evicted your hull to build some cranes. :) Is that for the flip? I think if I was doing a gantry in the shop I would just rope the beam to the rafters and then build up the feet right in place. Probably easier without a giant hull in the way though.
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