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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Outdoor build of GA
« Last post by Brian.Dixon on Today at 06:11:36 AM »
Another viable option (check the rules) is to consider finishing up in a storage unit type shelter .... the roof-only type where boats and RVs get stored.  Might have to get a small portable generator for some work, but for outfitting, painting, and that sort of thing, this might be another option.  If it violates the rules however, then there's a lot of liability parked around you in a place like that .... but for some aspects of finishing up, it can work (once the boat's on a trailer.  You could even park it there, bring it home to work on in the driveway, then haul it back.  Sometimes you have to be creative but where there's a will, there's a way.

Brian

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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Outdoor build of GA
« Last post by json on November 20, 2018, 06:11:30 PM »
Thanks for weighing in Brian. You bring up good points about just ignoring or leading the city enforcers on to get the stuff done and chalking any fines up to part of the cost of acquiring a bad ass boat. It sounds like a good tactic to use honestly, I will definitely keep that in mind. Also hearing that someone built a GA outside in AK makes me feel a lot better about the prospects of building outside. If he could get it from getting inundated with water I should be able to do the same I imagine (like I said, not much rain). I saw that a gentleman built a Tolman jumbo in a boat yard in San Diego under a costco canopy, I could see that type of thing getting leveled in a bout of heavy wind but with the right seasonal planning maybe I could get it up and down before it became an issue. Anyways, thanks again for your ideas. I am sure I will have many more questions moving forward, sounds like this is the place to ask them.
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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Outdoor build of GA
« Last post by Brian.Dixon on November 20, 2018, 11:31:53 AM »
The process will be one of those one step at a time things, figuring it out as you go.  You're not the first though ... I know a guy in Alaska who built his outside.  He tried to keep the coating down to a minimum when there was direct sunlight on the project and that sort of thing, e.g. coat late afternoon or early evening (paint or epoxy) when it's cooling and dry.  He did have his project get rained on right after adding a fresh coat of epoxy to the sheer decks ... it was sort of funny though, because the rain created a natural anti-skid dimpled surface that turned out pretty cool.  The rain just bounces off the wet epoxy.  He did go ahead an add another coat later though, once it was dry.

Sometimes you can violate CC&Rs and get the HOA cops after you if you need to in order to get a stage of the process done.  I would view such things as a temporary cost to pay while you finish up the project.  Fines usually aren't too bad and you only have to pay them off before you sell the house.... for example, plan ahead on things like painting the exterior and then build a temporary shelter that you leave up for a month .... do your work and then take it down .... pay the fines if there are any and move on.  So?  :)

Some have built in the garage for 90% of the build (all but the top half of the pilot house) and have had the building jig on wheels so you could roll or rotate it out, work on it and put it back.  Others have built temporary 'extensions' out of tarp or plywood on the front of their garage to extend the boat working area out onto the driveway.  If the HOA complains, tell them you're taking it down as soon as you can... keep'm on a string :)

Brian

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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Outdoor build of GA
« Last post by json on November 20, 2018, 10:33:38 AM »
Hi all,

I have recently started building a GA. I live in southern California, and am lucky enough to have a pretty decent spot to build a boat. My city (Orange) is somewhat a bunch of sticklers about things though, to the point where they made me build a 6 foot fence to make a shop yard if I was going to be building anything in my driveway. I am pretty sure they won't let me build a temporary shelter for a project like this (some people might think it's an eyesore?), so that said what am I going to run into if I do a lot of this build outside? The temperature is pretty mild, there is direct sunlight though, and some things concern me like condensation on things like the jig or pieces of wood that I have yet to encapsulate. I know many people who contribute here build in enclosed shops in the pac nw (I am from a portland suburb so it's definitely a stark contrast to the weather we receive here). My weather very rarely gets below freezing and we get very little rain. It's typically sunny and 70.

I guess the long and short of it is what things should I be aware of / trying to prevent when I am building outside? Is moisture in the air going to be of concern? Can I cover my project in a tied down tarp when I am not working on it to sufficiently protect it from the elements? I can build a lot of the sub-assemblies in my shop but it's only 25x25 so I don't quite have the room in there. Any ideas/advise would be extremely welcome.

Thanks!

Jason
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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Materials for build
« Last post by Brian.Dixon on November 15, 2018, 06:41:36 AM »
Thanks.   Something bound to happen soon I hope.  Iím trying to pound out honey-doos so I can start cutting something boat related.  Iíve run out of excuses!

Yes ... but don't stress and push too hard either.  It takes the fun out of the process... building a boat is fun and ought to stay that way :)

bd
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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Materials for build
« Last post by Todd j on November 14, 2018, 07:14:45 PM »
Thanks.   Something bound to happen soon I hope.  Iím trying to pound out honey-doos so I can start cutting something boat related.  Iíve run out of excuses!
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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Materials for build
« Last post by Brian.Dixon on November 14, 2018, 08:36:50 AM »
Sounds good.  I will be doing some searching here and elsewhere re: epoxy.  Thatís one I canít afford to screw up.  I have read every build in the forums for the entertainment value.   Need to hit it again and take  notes!

Top choices that I've seen lately:

- eBond Marine Epoxy (NOT their polyester resin stuff)
- Aeromarine
- RAKA
- Progressive Polymers No Blush (#2 or -II?)
- System III General Purpose (or the Silvertip no-blush version if you want to pay for it)

This is not a comprehensive list.  Use whatever non-shrinking, no-volatiles, marine epoxy that's designed for wetting out fiberglass that you want.  It's OK to buy the cheapest if it meets these requirements.  The non-blushing types save some work for you and prices are not significantly different.

Brian
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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Materials for build
« Last post by Todd j on November 13, 2018, 07:50:43 PM »
Sounds good.  I will be doing some searching here and elsewhere re: epoxy.  Thatís one I canít afford to screw up.  I have read every build in the forums for the entertainment value.   Need to hit it again and take  notes!
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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Materials for build
« Last post by Brian.Dixon on November 13, 2018, 03:19:23 PM »
Estimating that way is probably about as close as anyone can do.  Lots of variables along the way.  Used boats have their own problems you know, like shoddy construction where you can't see it, mechanical or other failures about to happen, or well-done but requires a 2nd and 3rd mortgage to buy.  And are they ever laid out the way you want?  These are a few of the reasons that convince most to build their own.

Note that on the fiberglass that the numbers are generally rounded off ... like someone selling some 8.4 oz fiberglass tape lists it as 9 oz, or 9.7 ounce tape gets listed as 9 oz by some and as 10 oz for others.  Close enough.  The boat is over-strong.  Try to land close but don't sweat it if you can't hit the numbers exactly.  You'll never know the difference and neither will anyone else!  Try FS again ... or RAKA marine.  They've been around for decades and are reliable.

BTW, another idea is to hit http://www.woodfinder.net ... It still works.  Another is http://www.noahsmarine.com/items.asp?Cc=33 ....


Brian

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General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: Materials for build
« Last post by Todd j on November 13, 2018, 11:39:55 AM »
Just looking for the width and weight you called for.  Nothing I thought was weird.   FS didnít have 9 oz tape.  Didnít have the cloth.  Mostly didnít have the time to sell me.  Anyway Not giving up.  I am a bit lazy, I would like a quote for the BOM and leave all the thinking on my end out of it. 
  So, funny thing happened last couple of weeks.  My wife has been paying a lot of attention to used boats on CL now that the building is finished.  To keep the peace I sharpened my pencil and something to run by Brian.   I used your  BOM for the hulll for a 28.5í boat and multiplied the cost for plywood, stringers, and jig by 2.  Thought this was safe.  Used the cost of materials for glassing the hull with 30 gallons of epoxy and used a 1.5 multiplier.  Found a list/cost summary for the Pau Hauna hope I spelled it right.  Looks like my dollar amount is pretty close even though the wood/glass split doesnít quite line up. 
   What are your thoughts on estimating this way?   I know itís just a estimate, Iím trying to get a number I can undershoot.  Not a target

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