Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Topics - Brian.Dixon

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 5
1
Announcements / WEBSITE IS BACK UP! (DISCOUNT - SEE INSIDE!)
« on: November 10, 2019, 03:49:17 PM »
We have fully recovered our databases and website, and the Glacier Boats of Alaska is back UP!!  See:  https://www.glacierboats.com

Thank you for your patience!  Here's a discount for you ... it runs through the end of the month (November):  Enter ThankYou19 at check-out to receive $10 off on Great Alaskan Plans (download only)!

Brian


2
Announcements / NEW Spray Rail alternative drawing
« on: September 23, 2019, 09:44:53 AM »

FYI - I just uploaded Sheet 012Alt, an alternative spray rail shape and location.  This version has good up-sweep towards the bow for a more sporty look, and at the stern end, the rails sweep upward 1-1/2" from their lowest location.  This 'smile' shaped spray rail helps the boat look better on the water even if loaded a little heavy in the stern... old boat painters trick :)

Brian

PS: Scroll waaaay to the bottom of the file list on our website's Downloads page.  I need to fix the sort order, but for now, the new file appears down at the bottom of the list.


3
Great Alaskan FAQ / Electrical design by Dan Boccia <- Read this!
« on: June 16, 2019, 10:18:38 AM »
Dan Boccia (Alaska) provided the following article which provides a great starting point for wiring up your boat, what order you should follow, and some great words of wisdom that'll save you some heartache!  I've inserted some notes and references where you see [EDIT] preceding some information.

[CAVEAT] Learn basic Ohm's Law and electrical design, how to use a basic multimeter, and the basics of working with electrical wire (types, gauges, crimping and attaching connectors - including on those big battery cables, etc).  Reference to Nigel Calder's book is given below.

From Dan:

Finished the cabin electrical wiring finally. Deleted the cabin wiring diagrams above, replacing them with the diagram below, that now includes wiring for running/anchor lights through a double-pole double-throw (DPDT) switch. Also deleted a photo that came in sideways. I'll take some pictures of the finished installation in the next few days.

Here are my thoughts on the electrical system from what I have, in some cases painfully, learned:

1. Every single current-carrying wire should have circuit protection, period. Battery-mounted fuses make this easy to do these days, ABYC exceptions for main battery cables be damned. Be sure the circuit protection is appropriate for the smallest wire in that circuit. Know how to use ampacity and voltage loss tables when sizing wires, and be conservative (size wires up when in doubt).

2. Do your wire and equipment layout/design first before running out to buy equipment, wire, etc. Understand how things are going to be wired. There's a lot of time to be saved, and safety to be gained, by doing your layout ahead of time. I posted my diagrams for a starting point/inspiration.

[EDIT] Make sure you follow ABYC Marine Wiring color coding on both your wiring diagram and in the boat.  If or when this is not possible, use clear labeling on each end of every wire segment so that anyone doing maintenance in the future doesn't have to guess on the origin or application of any particular wiring.  Color code table below.

3. Understand batteries - the different types, how to size them, how they like to be charged. Read Nigel Calder's book and understand it. Another huge time saver. Note that AGM batteries being charged directly from an outboard is not ideal and will likely result in reduced battery life.

4. Be sure to bond any aluminum fuel tanks and tank fill fittings to your common neutral bus.

[EDIT] Bonding is not grounding, although it sorta is.  "Bonding" means "In a direct current (DC) system, make all negative (0 volt) wiring the same voltage - no fractions of a volt above or below each other because that can result in 'ground loops' - unexpected current, corrosion, and shock potential".  In short, bonding means all negative wiring must end up at a common 0-volt reference somewhere.  Bonding includes ground buses, and those ground buses are connected to motors (your true source of 0 volts), and you motors should have zincs on them.  The motor bonding connection must be to the same metal that eventually leads to the zincs - most modern motors have a bolt on them for this purpose).

5. Windshield wiper installation is a complex and shockingly expensive sub-project. I highly recommend the Roca W12 wiper motors over any of the junk from AFI, Marinco, etc. The Roca motors are quiet, and feature super nice infinitely adjustable sweep that is simple to set up, maximizing the sweep area on your window. I tried to avoid the synchronized controls in favor of the Cole-Hersey knob-type controls, but regret this. Get the synchronized controller with its switch, which I may ultimately end up doing. Having 3 wipers out of sync can drive you bonkers, and my attempt to get the outside wipers in sync manually failed - now the outside wipers really only function on interval, which should get me by for awhile. Get the control!

6. For most common anchor/all around top lights and side running lights, you'll need a DPDT switch that allows the forward-facing top light to turn on when you want running lights OR you want anchor light.

7. In general, the best sequence of work is to mount ALL of your electrical equipment, roughly run ALL of your wires a little long (all of them labeled at both ends), locate wire anchors (typically zip ties with anchor-blocks) then either start terminations on the field wiring and work toward the central panel, or vise-versa.

8. Have a way to label the wires worked out. I ended up with the Brady labeling machine that prints on heat shrink and love that solution. You can also use a cheap $25 label maker and use non-adhesive low-temp clear heat shrink to cover the labels. I could not find the appropriate clear heat shrink locally.

That's enough for now.

Moving on to the electronics installation now.....more opportunities to drill holes in the boat!

[EDIT]  Some additional notes:
  • Electrical wiring always needs service at some point - the ends corrode and stuff ages.  You want to have excess wire near each end of a wire.
     Electricians call this a "service loop" - there is enough extra wire at the ends for you to snip some off, add a new connector, and to reinstall.  See next topic - drip loops
  • In a boat wiring job, you want to have 'drip loops' near each connection.  A drip loop is excess wire that makes a downward U-turn from it's connector so that moisture or water will run (gravity) down to the U-turn rather than into a bus or connector where it can cause corrosion.  See 'wrong way' and 'right way' drip loop photos below.  The 'right way' is Dan's boat.  The 'wrong way', surprisingly, came from a so-called professionally written article on boat wiring.  In addition to having the drip loop, make sure that (whenever you can), the connectors are installed at an upward angle rather than straight out, so that water (again) will tend to run away from the connection, not towards.  Finally, note that many marine connectors are available with silicone or other anti-water goop or coatings inside the crimp connectors to provide further protection.
  • Ignition-proof electronics, switches, etc are preferred.  Your fuel system, heating system, or anything that may unintentionally provide flammable liquid or gas to hidden areas can result in a boat fire.  Ignition-proof (Blue Sea etc) components are designed to a) provide NO sparks, and b) are generally sealed so that if a spark IS generated, it's encapsulated in the device.
  • Nigel Calder's excellent book: Boatowner's Mechanical and Electrical Manual
  • Also recommended, Metal Corrosion in Boats by Nigel Warren.  This book will also help with the understanding of bonding and corrosion in boats - a good read and an education for all boat owners.
  • Purpose of BRANCH protection: Branch circuit protection is FIRE protection and it's ONLY purpose is to prevent too much current in a wire so that the insulation will not heat up to the point that it catches on fire.  Branch circuit protection is NOT device protection!
  • Purpose of DEVICE protection:  Device protection is NOT for the prevention of fire.  Device protection is in ADDITION TO branch circuit protection.  It's purpose is to protect the devices in the boat, e.g. your electronics and other components - even motors etc.  The best way to design is to design a POWER DISTRIBUTION system with complete BRANCH protection first, then for sensitive devices, provide ADDITIONAL inline protection - Example) You might have 16 amp DC power wired throughout the boat, branch circuits come off of that at DC buses, and each branch circuit provides power to a device.  You would use wiring capable of more than 16 amps for the main power distribution and this wire should have a fuse or circuit breaker sized to protect THAT WIRE from over current.  Each branch circuit would have it's own fuse or circuit breaker to protect the branch circuit wire (for fire protection) that is sized according to the gauge of the branch circuit wire.  Finally, if the device is sensitive, you will also provide a device protection fuse or circuit breaker just for that's device's limitations (mfg info).  An example might be a 4-amp branch circuit with a 4-amp circuit breaker that feeds a radio with a 2-amp maximum current ... you'd put a 2-amp fuse inline on the branch circuit wire (after the circuit breaker, before the radio).
  • You can do this!  Take your time and draw it up in advance, including routing through the boat, and work through it systematically - and read Dan's info above, the Nigel books, and all documentation from the manufacturers of everything you bought for your wiring (or is powered by your wiring).

Dan's cabin electrical diagram (general diagrams below):



Dan's Power Distribution & Charging:



Dan's Neutral & Bonding:


ABYC Marine wiring color codes:


RIGHT way to use excess wire ('service loops') and drip loops, downward angled connections and awesome labeling!:


WRONG way to wire ... Looks GREAT, but there is ZERO slack for doing repairs and NOTHING to prevent moisture from running right into the connectors!





4
Great Alaskan FAQ / How to mount outboards? Motor mount template?
« on: June 14, 2019, 01:08:21 PM »
Here's a couple of drawings ... One shows the motor mount template for 150-300 hp motors, and the other shows a twin setup and how the holes fit around the stringers (use the upper end of the lower slots if mounting twin outboards).  The motor mount template fits on a 14-1/2 inch wide by 14 inch tall area - but it can be bigger too.  My favorite setup is to have an aluminum plate made according to the outboard template, then mount a short (4" or 6") bracket or jack plate to the hull ... and mount the outboard to the bracket or jack plate.  That makes a nice clean mount, room for the steering gear, and easier adjustability for tuning the height (jack plate).

FYI - The upper holes are 3/4 inch apart, vertically, measured center to center.

FYI - Also, if using a jack plate, you don't need a set of holes and a lower slot ... just 4 holes, the top 2 holes on top, and the top end of the slot on the bottom... do the adjusting with the jack plate.  Even a low-cost manual jack plate (or bracket with adjustment built in) is fine.

Brian

5
Announcements / PLANS UPDATED!
« on: April 22, 2019, 09:13:05 AM »
The following updates occurred today (4-22-2019):

  • A new drawing, Sheet A010 - Model Comparison, has been added to the Study Plans and to the Kodiak Addendum
  • The Study Plans main document has been updated (with a minor reference to the aforementioned new drawing)
  • The Kodiak Addendum main document has been updated (minor remarks about bottom panel assembly turnover and seam building)

Enjoy!
Brian


6
ANNOUNCEMENT - The new Kodiak Addendum has been ADDED to all Printed Plans (at no additional cost when buying printed plans sets).  Enjoy!

7
FYI - At one point in time, I stated that bow thrusters might not work on the Great Alaskan - the ones that have a horizontal tube through the bow (impeller inside) were for the most part too large to fit this non-deep-V style of hull.  But I have more recently discovered that there are both compact bow thrusters that may fit and at least one that uses jetted water through a couple of nozzles (port and starboard) that definitely will work on a Great Alaskan  In any case, just wanted to correct/update what I said in the past - It appears that we're all in luck now, and just in time for the larger Kodiak model of the Great Alaskan:

  https://www.jetthrusters.com/  Jetted bow thruster - Dutch made, available in the United States - Easy to have both bow and stern thrusters on even a small boat.

If it were me, I'd go with the water jet version ... quiet, no tricky installation near the keel fillet and glass, and can work in a variety of mounting locations, water inlet can be anywhere.

Brian


8

Certified NRA Training in the Boise, Idaho region:

- Safety in the home (teachers, nurses, clergy) - Firearm Familiarity and Safety

- 1:1 Handgun skill development, coaching, problem mitigation

- NRA Basic Pistol (meets concealed carry requirements for all states)

- NRA Personal Protection in the Home (PP ITH) (meets Idaho Enhanced CCL requirements - required if an Idaho resident desires an Oregon CCL)

- Idaho Enhanced Concealed Carry (fast-track pistol plus full NRA PP ITH above)

- WEBSITE: http://www.level9bfirearms.com


Thanks!  This is my business and I'm the certified trainer... give us a call if you're in the area

Brian



9
ANNOUNCEMENT - THE GREAT ALASKAN KODIAK MODEL ADDENDUM IS NOW AVAILABLE!! At almost 9-1/2' wide by up to 30' long, beefed up for commercial and/or serious recreational use, there is no other boat on the market like it!

Enjoy!
Brian


10
OK... First poll is closed.  Here are the finalists ... The winning entry gets the new addendum for the 'big and wide' Great Alaskan version for free.  If a combined name wins, then both naming parties win.  If I pick a name of my choice (always my right!), the winning vote(s) still win even if the name(s) are not used.  Thanks again for your votes!

Brian


11
Announcements / Big & Wide addendum coming
« on: March 13, 2019, 08:50:24 AM »
Over the years, I have received a lot of requests for making the Great Alaskan much bigger ... sometimes outlandishly big, as in "would need a total redesign".  That said, it's interesting to note that I did design the boat conservatively and it does have room for changes without compromising stability and performance.  I did that because I knew it would be a homebuilt boat and people need the flexibility to make their build a 'dream boat' build, lots of variation being acceptable.

So, why am I writing?  Well, I've decided to go with it to some degree and offer a Big & Wide option for the boat design, sold separately as an addendum (probably only $20 for the addendum).  This addendum will increase the waterline beam by a total of 4", and will increase the maximum beam (at the gunnels) to 9' 4" wide.  Loftings will be given for chine flats and sheer-deck shelves, shelf molds, and transom - all derived from accurate CAD models and drawings.  I haven't decided, but I may increase the depth of the hull by 2 to 4 inches as well - I need to model the changes so I can find out if the side panel plywood will span the distance (4' wide plywood).  Loftings will be provided for a default 28' boat, plus adjustments for 27', 29', and 30'.  The biggest boat that you could build from the plans+addendum would be 9'4" wide by 30' long (please do not ask me to go past these dimensions!  If you need or want bigger, I would suggest Mr. Sam Devlin... or switch to aluminum and go with the design of your choice from Specialty Marine in Oregon, http://www.specmar.com )

I will likely have the addendum packaged up and ready to go within 4 or 5 weeks.  Consider this a pre-announcement and an open discussion.  Thanks!  I look forward to your feedback!

Brian


12
Announcements / Terms & Conditions - Sticky - Please Read
« on: October 31, 2018, 12:07:39 PM »
Terms & Conditions:
  • Usage of these forums / boards convey your acceptance of our terms and conditions.
  • Profanity or vulgarity or other non-publicly acceptable content is not allowed.  What falls into this category is a subjective judgment made by our moderators.
  • Personal attacks on other members are not allowed.
  • Political and other off-topic discussions or postings are entirely encouraged, but please keep them in the Bilge Board
  • You are included in the newsletter distribution list unless you opt out (please contact us).  Note: We've never sent out a single newsletter in the last 15 years.
  • Your privacy is important to us - we will not share or distribute or otherwise provide your private information to anybody for any reason.  The exception is the public information included in your posts (only)
  • We do not provide contact information for other users of these forums.  If you need to contact someone via email or otherwise, we will be happy to relay your message if we are able (contact us) - otherwise, please make use of the forum private messaging capabilities for this.
  • The content, including attachments, in your posts are considered public domain.  Others that view this forum are likely to re-post text, images, links, and attachments from the posts that you make to other forums, websites, or social media sites.  If this is not OK with you, please refrain from posting - the public nature of forum posts negates our ability to control what others do with the forum content.  If you want to post, but do not want others to re-post your content, please make a note of it within your post, e.g. "This post and all attachments are copyright UserName - 2018 to present.  Permission to re-post this content on other sites is not granted."  Hopefully, people will obey that honor system decision on your part and will refrain from re-posting.  If someone violates your request, let us know and we'll ban them from our forums.
  • SPAM is not allowed.  What is and is not spam is a subjective judgment that will be made on the part of our moderators.  We encourage listings and links posted for legitimate (hopefully boat related) member businesses.
  • Violation of these terms and conditions are grounds for immediate and permanent banning from these forums
  • These terms and conditions are subject to change.  It is up to you to periodically check them.

Thank you!  Feedback welcome!

Brian
[Moderator]

14
Experimental Postings / Test picture attachment settings
« on: August 15, 2018, 06:38:24 AM »
Pix attached

15
Great Alaskan FAQ / Can I use a true inboard?
« on: April 26, 2018, 06:13:58 AM »
You can use a sterndrive in the Great Alaskan, but not a true inboard.  A true inboard has the motor mounted forward in the boat and a prop shaft running through the keel to a propeller.  A sterndrive, and its 'leg' has the motor mounted against the inside face of the transom, and the leg is mounted against the outer face of the transom, the motor and leg together 'clamp' the transom.  This arrangement keeps the weight of the motor very near the transom as designed.  A forward-motor inboard places the motor's center of gravity too far forward (too far for this particular design):

A STERNDRIVE is OK since it puts the weight of the motor and leg on or near the transom - The Great Alaskan IS designed for using a sterndrive (or outboard(s)):

(Example boat is NOT a Great Alaskan - FYI)



A true inboard is NOT OK since it puts the weight of the motor too far forward and that causes the boat's center of gravity to be too far forward (bow-down trim):

(Example boat is NOT a Great Alaskan - FYI)

Brian




Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 5