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Messages - Brian.Dixon

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1
I appreciate the reply. This information will help me move forward with my design plans.

Hopefully!!  :D

Brian


2
Welcome aboard, Rick.  Also see our Facebook page ... ask questions here or there.  Your plans sound perfect and the Great Alaskan sounds like a great choice for your intended usage and it'll have the seaworthiness and room that your family of 5 deserves :)

     https://www.facebook.com/glacier.boats.of.alaska


Brian


3
I'm at work and can't dig into the plans right now, but yes, the way to lengthen the boat is the same as shown for lengthening from 26' to 28' ... you space out all stations from amidships aft, e.g. from the widest point in the hull to the stern.  At the lengths that you're talking about, the boat is getting fairly long for how wide it is, and aspect ratio impacts maneuverability (it goes down as the boat gets too long for it's width) and it impacts roll stability (rolls easier as the boat gets too long for it's length).  Finally, as the boat gets longer (and I won't dig into the details right here), it's going to float higher on the water.  Too high and the boat risks some roll-direction stability issues .... "chine walking" where it'll plane a little heeled to one side, then flop over and plane a little heeled to the other side.  So.... What's the limit for length without also making the boat wider and heavier to compensate?  I dunno ... I only modeled the boat to 28' long.  I've had several design ideas presented to me, but frankly, a boat this size is a big job to redesign so I can't ... no time in my current schedule.  The longest version that is working well is Kent Cannon's 29' 4" one, but he also tends to load pretty heavy and that helps compensate for extra length.  I usually tell people that if they want to stretch the boat longer than I specify, that it's up to them and that it's their experiment, not mine (sorry if that's too frank - I tend to be straight forward and open).  If you DO experiment with long lengths and have good results - then it benefits everyone else who might want to.  Also, the GA is designed on the conservative side, with a deeper waterline than is required (by 1-1/2 to 2 inches) since that helps guarantee stability, so there is a certain amount of forgiveness built into the design.  I did that specifically because amateur builders like to enjoy some flexibility with the design as they create the boat of their dreams.  So ... you're now armed with more knowledge ... go forth and conquer!

Brian


4
General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: A house for my GA
« on: August 16, 2018, 12:49:19 PM »
It's OK to take a break and recuperate the finances ... pretty typical to do that.  Just buy enough to build the transom and get that done, then it'll be forever nagging you to come back and add the rest of the boat.  You don't want to accidentally postpone the project so long that you never do get your really cool new Great Alaskan!

Brian


5
Sweet!  And always glad to hear more great reviews of how the boat operates!  I cross-posted to FB.....

I've lost touch with my old military pals and pals from school ... sad.  This would've been my 40th anniversary of my high school graduation (if they had one ... they lost track of me too :( )


Brian

6
General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: A house for my GA
« on: August 16, 2018, 04:41:06 AM »
Looks great to me!  Are you going to add work benches?  For boat building, I find it useful to have a mid-sized bench with solid caster wheels that lets you move it around now and then - same for an epoxy bench.  When do you think you'll start cutting wood and messing up your beautiful new floor?  :D

Brian

7
General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: A house for my GA
« on: August 15, 2018, 06:45:40 AM »
Ok.  can screenshot my attempt too

I updated some important settings ... try your attachments again now :)

Brian

8
Experimental Postings / Test picture attachment settings
« on: August 15, 2018, 06:38:24 AM »
Pix attached

9
General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: A house for my GA
« on: August 14, 2018, 06:57:44 AM »
Iím having trouble posting pics.  Using attachments and other options, choose attachment from my camera roll and try to post.  It wonít allow that type of file.  Itís just a cell phone pic.  What am I doing wrong?

Good question!  Can you email me an example image file?  Send to brian dot dixon AT glacierboats dot com

It could be a file type issue, a file size issue, dimensions issue ... I'll know more when I get an example file that refuses to work.  We'll fix it one way or another ... people want to see your pix!

bd


10

Nice!  You do quick AND good work!  Glad it all worked out!  I'm anxious to see how it all turns out when it's done.  Have you been dreaming up color schemes and trim ideas yet?

Brian

11

Interesting dilemma!  You raised the sides 4" (more or less)?  The cuddy roof can be raised, left where it was, or you can pick somewhere between according to how the boat looks to you and how much headroom you want inside the cuddy, e.g. you've got to be able to sit upright on a bunk ... at least on the aft end.

That said, the vertical height that you circled in red (above) is about 14".  Your dilemma is due to not increasing the height of the aft cuddy bulkhead the same amount that the hull sides were raised, but the f'w'd cuddy bulkhead was ... because it mounts at the height of the sheer deck.  Fortunately, it's all easy enough to fix.

If it were me, I'd sit in the cuddy and decide on whether I want the extra headroom as described by the top of the f'w'd cuddy bulkhead, or if the headroom is OK if you left the aft cuddy bulkhead's roof height the same.   Then I'd stand outside the boat and look at it ... would it look OK to leave the aft bulkhead the way it is and then to reduce (cut down) the height of the forward bulkhead?  Or maybe it looks better if you raise the aft bulkhead's roof arch high enough to match the forward one?  You can make a cardboard (or hardboard) template that clamps or screws to the aft cuddy bulkhead and draw your roof and side lines on that, then trace the top of the existing aft cuddy bulkhead onto it.  Then cut out the top extension an glue it on, clamping or screwing straight edges on the face so it matches the existing bulkhead.  Glass the seam with light glass (6-oz) or so and fair it in ... when it's painted, nobody will ever know.  Note that if you raise the roof on the aft cuddy bulkhead, that you'll likely want to make the door opening taller too.

Anyway ... The options are up to you and it comes down to aesthetics and headroom decisions.  Personally, I like the look of a taller hull versus a shorter-looking house and cuddy.  It just looks more seaworthy to me, especially if combined with a tall coaming around the cockpit.

Brian


12
General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: A house for my GA
« on: July 31, 2018, 04:50:24 AM »
I will do that.  The opening is what it is now.  With everything Iíve done Iím  early 10 times over budget.  Itís almost time to build a boat

You've done an outstanding job ... sorry about the shop budget!  I know how that goes.  My shop in Alaska started out as a "think garden shed ... but bigger with more square footage" and turned into a $60k 2-floor project!  I could've built TWO boats for the price of the ONE shop...

Brian


13
General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: A house for my GA
« on: July 30, 2018, 08:33:36 AM »
You need to post before and after pix ... you've done a tremendous job on your shop!

Probably too late now, but a steel beam header over the garage door will gain you a few inches versus using a standard wood-beam (glu-lams or LVL) header. 

Brian

14
Windows are in the shop. Now I can side, wire and insulate. Build the big boat door and maybe I can start great alaskaning by 2020.

When you wire, run the wires horizontally through the studs (drill large holes) at about 24" off the floor or so ... this is typical of builders, so the wires will be where expected by folks in the future that may have to tear into a wall.  Also, make sure you run the wires long near the receptacles, with about 8-10 inches of extra wire in the wall (a downward belly in the wiring) .... when receptacles get replaced, it's common to pull a little more wire out of the wall so you can trim the old ends and strip new wire.  The most common mistake made by those wiring their own stuff is to have wiring going from one receptacle to another drum-tight ... really sux if you're the one that has to repair something.  Anyway ... just thinking out loud.

bd



15
General Discussion about the Great Alaskan / Re: A house for my GA
« on: July 16, 2018, 08:51:53 AM »
Yay!  Progress!  Good idea to gain a couple of inches with some dirt work ... the more room the better.  :D

Brian


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